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Workaholism rife in electronics

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Bert22306
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re: Workaholism rife in electronics
Bert22306   3/4/2013 8:41:25 PM
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Working for a few hours on weekends, for no pay, is not an imposition if the work can be conducted efficently and if you do it voluntarily. Seems to me that to qualify as a workaholic, a person has to consider himself almost like a martyr. But if you do the work because you feel like it and it's fun anyway, pretty tough to consider yourself a workaholic. Unless you enjoy that term, for some reason.

David Ashton
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re: Workaholism rife in electronics
David Ashton   3/4/2013 10:23:04 PM
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“Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.” ? Confucius But that's not always the reason people work long hours. If you are working long hours and it's NOT for the above reason, there's something wrong.

EREBUS0
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re: Workaholism rife in electronics
EREBUS0   3/4/2013 11:02:04 PM
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Engineers love a challenge. Chasing down a bug successfully can consume hours before you realize it. There are also "business" reasons for forcing overtime, but in my experience, you seldom get any real benefit for the extra hours you force people to work. Now when they work because they are excited about the project, thats just magic. Companies need to encourage the magic without using a whipp. The results benefit all concerned. Just my opinion.

krisi
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re: Workaholism rife in electronics
krisi   3/4/2013 11:47:57 PM
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If you are working on weekends because it is fun that is OK...but if you have to then there is something wrong with that picture

daleste
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re: Workaholism rife in electronics
daleste   3/5/2013 2:58:46 AM
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Yes, engineers tend to put in a lot of hours because they love their work, but many companies take advantage of that to get free labor. Also, when the job market is like it is now, engineers put in more hours to avoid being the next casualty.

mac_droz
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re: Workaholism rife in electronics
mac_droz   3/5/2013 12:47:34 PM
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I always pick companies where work is not required after hours. I work 8 hours a day (plus 30min for break) and go home. Not a minute longer. I enjoy my time during work but that's about it. I can't even access email outside work and don't answer phone over hours - to be honest nobody even expects it. I try to be efficient in work but it's just work so I set the deadlines in a way that I can have time to learn while making projects (reading EE Times included) to make myself even more efficient and employable.

mcgrathdylan
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re: Workaholism rife in electronics
mcgrathdylan   3/5/2013 4:42:01 PM
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That sounds like a terrific set up. I wonder in today's world what percentage of companies are on board with a strict 8 hour work day. BTW, glad to see you are budgeting time for reading EE Times :)

GQQSER2
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re: Workaholism rife in electronics
GQQSER2   3/5/2013 5:29:34 PM
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I usually work a couple of hours on Sunday evenings. The reason is because Asia is coming back online and any issues I deal with on Sunday makes for an easier Monday (most of the time).

rick merritt
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re: Workaholism rife in electronics
rick merritt   3/5/2013 9:43:37 PM
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I often hear tales of folks who work early or late to be on conference calls with colleagues around the globe.

old account Frank Eory
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re: Workaholism rife in electronics
old account Frank Eory   3/6/2013 8:18:47 AM
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Work/life balance has always been a struggle for as long as I've been in this profession. I have to say though, I appreciate the benefits that technology has brought us that make it easier to achieve that balance. In the old days, if you needed to put in extra hours, you either went in extra early or stayed until well after dark -- and missed out on family dinners or dropping kids off at school. Today we are untethered. If you have a conference call with Europe in the morning or with India in the evening, nobody cares where you are when you're doing it. When it's time to leave the office and go home to the family, you just go -- and do the call from wherever you are when it's time to dial in.

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