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When is IP theft OK?

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old account Frank Eory
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re: When is IP theft OK?
old account Frank Eory   3/1/2013 10:16:34 PM
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In summary, it is not ok to steal IP, but not every patent actually contains IP. Some patents would be declared invalid if someone thought it was worth the money & effort to challenge the patent in court. Your example about the H-bridge-in-a-defibrillator patent might seem like case in point, but I suspect the court might rule this to be a valid patent if the inventor was the first to combine those two things. That might seem ludicrous to we engineers, who learned about H-bridges many years ago from a college textbook, and who are also aware that defibrillators have been around for decades. But the USPTO often considers combinations of prior art -- even fairly obvious combinations -- to be "new IP." This is yet another way in which our patent system is broken. I wouldn't go so far as to despise the word "inventor," because occasionally a genuine inventor actually comes along and, well, invents something -- really invents something. But I fully appreciate your disdain for those who simply capitalize on the lack of an existing claim on obvious combinations of existing inventions.

sprite0022
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re: When is IP theft OK?
sprite0022   3/4/2013 12:59:04 AM
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seems americans forget U2 story. americans are more eager and shameless in spying other nations IP than anyone else !! you think US has lost it's U2 spirit, naaa,

DarkMatter0
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re: When is IP theft OK?
DarkMatter0   3/4/2013 4:50:41 PM
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"Designing around" can sometimes just be a search for loopholes, but sometimes it can result in real innovation.

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