Breaking News
Blog

Pixy: A Simple Vision System for Arduino

NO RATINGS
1 saves
View Comments: Oldest First | Newest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 2
Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: OMG I'm Drooling!
Max The Magnificent   9/3/2013 11:08:26 AM
NO RATINGS
@Etmax: I promised my wife a holiday she would enjoy too this time :-)

What wife wouldn't want to go to Design West 2014? LOL

kfield
User Rank
Blogger
Things have come a long way...
kfield   9/30/2013 9:10:47 AM
NO RATINGS
It's great to hear about these initiatives - technology has certainly come a long way since the robotic mail carriers at Texas Instruments, lurching along a path of reflective tape.

Caleb Kraft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Things have come a long way...
Caleb Kraft   9/30/2013 9:13:46 AM
NO RATINGS
At least with this module it could see the tape even if it wasn't reflective!

stig1957
User Rank
Rookie
Brilliant, Simple, and Powerful
stig1957   2/22/2014 9:26:11 AM
NO RATINGS
 

I think this is brilliant.  It's the simple ideas that have the biggest impact.  Working in machine vision for twenty years I can tell you, the shop floor guys spend an enormous amount of time trying to get their system to track color and shapes.  Constantly re-inventing the wheel.

Fundamentally Pixy acts much like a human eye.  It sends info to the brain for it's consideration and has built in ability to separate colors and detect edges.

Beautiful.

<<   <   Page 2 / 2
Most Recent Comments
Kevin Krewell
 
daleste
 
Ian Johns
 
Etmax
 
daleste
 
alex_m1
 
Ian Johns
 
David Ashton
 
MeasurementBlues
Top Comments of the Week
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
"All the King's horses and all the KIng's men gave up on Humpty, so they handed the problem off to Engineering."
5 comments
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
David Patterson, known for his pioneering research that led to RAID, clusters and more, is part of a team at UC Berkeley that recently made its RISC-V processor architecture an open source hardware offering. We talk with Patterson and one of his colleagues behind the effort about the opportunities they see, what new kinds of designs they hope to enable and what it means for today’s commercial processor giants such as Intel, ARM and Imagination Technologies.
Flash Poll