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Tips & Tricks for Storing Recycled Electronic Components

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Crusty1
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CEO
Re: Klunk
Crusty1   5/1/2014 3:24:41 PM
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@David: All this talk of storage has got me started on getting my components sorted out, quite a lot arnt at the moment.

I now have a spreadsheet itemising what I have and where it is and if possible a hyperlink to a datasheet.

Biggest headache so far is how to store these pesky 1 and 2 off packets of smd IC's, unlike their through hole old age cousins it not easy to poke them into conductive foam.

Well I have come up with an old siolution to a modern problem a 3*5 card index box and staple the non conductive bags to each card. The card top has delails like Part No and a unique card sequence number, with that I can locate it on the spread sheet and the little critters are stored efficently.

 

David Ashton
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Blogger
Re: Klunk
David Ashton   5/1/2014 7:03:28 PM
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@Crusty nice thinking - I like the spreadsheet idea with instant access to data sheets.  I got a set of old bar code readers and thought vaguely about using them to scan a label on the component storage and bringing up the datasheet instantly.   Acheivable I think, but not a huge return on the effort involved.....

 

salbayeng
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Rookie
Re: Klunk
salbayeng   5/2/2014 12:10:42 AM
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Storage of those annoying strips of SMD IC's.

One really useful way of doing this is take a large antistatic bag and cut it up into say A4 pieces , you fold in two flaps say 2" or 3" , then pass it through a bag sealing machine ($30 from ebay), and seal all the way across, every 3/4" or so. This will yield two rows of pockets , with about 20-30 pockets in total. When you fold the sheet on itself , the parts or strips won't fall out of the pockets , the pocket will also hold loose parts. With a bit of care you can also use the existing folds in antistat bags to advantage. You can use the same approach to make field kits of parts, and you can roll them up if needed too.

The advantages are that
  • there is sufficient space to write the part number and other details on the pocket (unlike pill boxes) , Note: always write the SMD code on there , so you can rehome those orphan SOT-23 devices.
  • Organized: You can keep all the similar parts together, so you are not searching for the one ziplog bag with the MAX232 chips, at the crucial instant when you have pasted up a proto board.
  • The volume is much less (than individual ziplog bags) , and you can store them in two-ring binders with datasheets if you want.
  • You can make the pockets any size you want.
  • Cheap! Just recycle the bags that parts come in.
  • Strong! the mylar antistat bags dont tear with the edges of the carrier tape
  • You need just one desiccant satchel for ~ 100 or so different parts, as they all fit neatly in a large ziptop bag.

 

I have a XL spreadsheet with all the parts in . Then you can just print off labels from one column. The "&" command is useful here and the alt-enter too. I have a second worksheet too that uses a lookup function to turn a "short name" into a fully qualified part number and vendor p/n so "10u10" becomes "963-LMK212F106ZG-T" . I also have hash codes and "quikbin" codes to naturally sort parts adjacent to similar parts.
For bulk parts I use ziplog bags, and keep them in white cardboard boxes. It's important to have all the boxes the same size! I use 4"x9"x12" boxes, they are sold flat in 50qty's, this size will take A4 sheets of paper , very helpful!.

 

David Ashton
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Klunk
David Ashton   5/2/2014 12:33:37 AM
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@salbayeng....nice idea for the SMD bits.  I got a plastic sealing machine some time ago nor next to nothing on a sale, I knew it would come in useful some day... :-)

> "It's important to have all the boxes the same size!"

Very much so, this is they key to efficient storage!

 

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