Breaking News
Blog

Life With Spock, Part 2: When Your Child Is Born an Engineer

NO RATINGS
1 saves
< Previous Page 2 / 3 Next >
View Comments: Oldest First | Newest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 5   >   >>
_hm
User Rank
CEO
A precocious child?
_hm   8/9/2013 8:13:12 PM
NO RATINGS
It is very interesting to watch our children growing with different abilities and different interests. To parents all kids are briliant and that may be true.

However, to brand one's kid at so early age is not good premonition. At this tender age they should be given more wider exposure to different possiblities. Also in place of branding and binding them with (sometime) your own inner desire is not desirable practice.

All kids should be given carte blanche to pursue what they dream to be correct and support them in fulfulling their dreams.

 

 

AccidentallyInteresting
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Skipping a generation
AccidentallyInteresting   8/9/2013 10:06:16 PM
NO RATINGS
This article is cracking me up. I don't think any of my toys escaped my screwdriver.

 

"but I was only interested in tracing the paths of the pipes in the sprinkler system."


Hah! I did the same thing to my parents when I was about 5. They took me to a museum and the only thing I was interested in was all the pipes and conduit hung from the ceiling. I'm 33 now and my mother still tells that story to people!

Klinkenbecker
User Rank
Rookie
Yawn...!
Klinkenbecker   8/10/2013 2:52:30 PM
NO RATINGS
This is almost as exciting as watching your holiday/vacation photos.

Nevermind that Spock wasn't an engineer. Scotty was the engineer.

Having spent my life as an engineer, I can tell you people regard us as one level above a plumber - a necessary, but expensive, overhead.

Pretty much the way Scotty is treated in the program in fact...

 

WKetel
User Rank
Rookie
It was obvious that I would be an engineer
WKetel   8/10/2013 8:58:30 PM
NO RATINGS
It was fairly obvious that I was going to be an engineer when I was taking my toys aprt to see how they worked, and then putting them back together and they worked. And having a strong interest in how things went together and how they worked, not just in what they did. Then inventing all kinds of things that did work, but I was not that skilled as an 9 year old. But I could build all kinds of circuits with relays and not pop fuses, which was quite a skill. All of that with a good reading ability and I was into all of the adult technical stuff at the library, and having to argue with the librarians because of trying to check out technical books when I "should have stayed in the childrens section". But I was always able to read about things that I could not afford to buy, and may not have been able to work with, at ages 10 and 11. But reading is a much safer way to explore a lot of technology than putting hands on it. Books seldom give shocks, start fires, or explode. But A kid who reads can learn a whole lot. 

DrQuine
User Rank
CEO
Patents and innovation in the blood
DrQuine   8/10/2013 10:27:48 PM
NO RATINGS
I taught my son HTML programming when he was 11 (back in 1995 when it wasn't so common).  Soon he was running circles around me and critiquing my coding practices.  However, it was when he was 15 and watched me prototyping an invention that a brief time away from my desk resulted in Alex creating an animated demonstration far superior to my static one.  Furthermore, he identified a gap in the concept and invented the solution. In due course, a joint patent application was filed and the patent issued just after his 21st birthday. As a result, there have been 4 generations of patent holding inventors in my family: great-grandfather, grandfather, myself (with 49), and my son.  Only my father (Prof. Willard Van Orman Quine) is missing - and he was a renowned philosopher and mathematician at Harvard University for 65 years. I guess each generation just inspires another.

Caleb Kraft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Skipping a generation
Caleb Kraft   8/11/2013 4:53:31 PM
NO RATINGS
That's hillarious. I could see my engineer some doing that exact same thing.

Caleb Kraft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A precocious child?
Caleb Kraft   8/11/2013 4:57:27 PM
NO RATINGS
This article is merely observations of his behavior. Every parent watches their children and gets to know and predict their behavior. Also, every parent pushes their inner desires on their children, because our desires are for them to thrive and succeed in life. I don't care if he gets an engineering degree, I'm just noting that he has these tendencies.

_hm
User Rank
CEO
Re: A precocious child?
_hm   8/11/2013 5:37:28 PM
NO RATINGS
@Caleb: Thanks for clarifications. However, I have first hand experience that young student looking very much like very good potential engineer have become most renowned medical surgeon.

 

Susan Rambo
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Skipping a generation
Susan Rambo   8/11/2013 6:08:43 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for you post. Interesting your youthful fascination with sprinkler systems and how it indicates that the engineering gene (not the farming gene) was part of your neurbiological inheritance. Makes a lot of sense.

My father was always tinkering with the sprinklers but it never occurred to me it was because he was fascinated by them. It seemed more like he was doing battle with them. (Perhaps it was just the clay soil he was doing battle with.)

Thanks again for your post.

Susan Rambo
User Rank
Blogger
Re: My son the engineer (chemical engineer)
Susan Rambo   8/11/2013 7:10:31 PM
NO RATINGS
@visi_guy: Thanks for your post. I hope your son can find some relief. He has an extra burden to carry when he goes off to school but it's good he knows about it now and is getting treatment. It understand how incomprensible it is. It's amazing how little we know about how the brain works, but as time (and research) goes on, I'm sure we'll know more about these disorders and have better treatments.

I just finished reading the book Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety by Daniel Smith, about the author coming to terms with his anxiety disorder and how he gradually learns to cope with it. I recommend it. His website is here.

On a hopeful note, Hugh Herr, the MIT Media Lab professor, gave a keynote at EE Times's DESIGN West in which he postulated that one day electronic devices will provide "cleaner" treatment for these conditions your son, and millions of others, have. By "cleaner" he meant fewer, or no, side effects compared with pharmaceutical treatments. It was a hopeful speech. Maybe your children will be part of that solution.

Thanks again. Take care.

<<   <   Page 2 / 5   >   >>
More Blogs
Why is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration such a slacker at enforcing safety laws? A US Senate subcommittee wants to investigate.
Apple and Samsung are poised to ship their first smartphones using 20nm mobile processors, but they are applying the silicon technology in radically different ways.
Dilbert remains a great source of comic relief, but the misimpressions from that comic about marketing should be viewed as nothing more than a spoof.
Perhaps this is the natural order of business -- Darwinism and RadioShack's impending demise open the door wider for companies like SparkFun and Adafruit to grow.
Gartner Hype Cycle pegs wearables, connected homes, and consumer 3D printing as 5 to 10 years away from becoming popular among most consumers.
Top Comments of the Week
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
"All the King's horses and all the KIng's men gave up on Humpty, so they handed the problem off to Engineering."
5 comments
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
David Patterson, known for his pioneering research that led to RAID, clusters and more, is part of a team at UC Berkeley that recently made its RISC-V processor architecture an open source hardware offering. We talk with Patterson and one of his colleagues behind the effort about the opportunities they see, what new kinds of designs they hope to enable and what it means for today’s commercial processor giants such as Intel, ARM and Imagination Technologies.
Flash Poll