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Consumers staying away from high-end PCs

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SylvieBarak
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re: Consumers staying away from high-end PCs
SylvieBarak   11/12/2012 5:17:47 PM
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Same, Jack! I also have the VAIO and it stays on Stamina pretty much permanently, but that's because I have never really noticed it lagging enough for me to want to speed it up. PC gaming, for the most part, has become such a niche that for most of us, the speed of a regular core i5 or core i7 machine is as fast as we'd ever need. I did crack up a little yesterday when I saw an episode of Dexter where one of the lab guys was using an AlienWare gaming PC to run data though... sure, it only has 45 minutes of battery life, but why not?? ;)

ttt3
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re: Consumers staying away from high-end PCs
ttt3   11/12/2012 5:36:52 PM
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Only two places I currently see high-end desktops utilized are: 1) Traditional hardcore gamers will continue to demand high-end graphics cards and quad-plus core CPUs. This market is however changing rapidly due to the surge of gaming on handheld devices (iPhone, iPad, etc). 2) Business workstations. I work for a ~200 person engineering company and our mechanical/CAD folks typically use high-end PCs for everyday graphics and compute intensive applications such as Pro/ENGINEER and Cadence Allegro. I'd imagine similar for other businesses i.e. graphic design, etc. Sure, we have servers running Xeon/etc for long term simulations and such but the high end PC still sees quite a bit of usage. Further, with PCs having a lifetime of 5 years or so, the lack of innovation in the PC market, and weak economy, replacement purchases are being put off. Bad news for the PC industry.

sranje
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re: Consumers staying away from high-end PCs
sranje   11/12/2012 6:19:52 PM
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All excellent points - thank you. Like with RIM versus iPhone --- notebooks are business and tablets consumer devices. And - there are more users for consumer device...

Tcat_Houser
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re: Consumers staying away from high-end PCs
Tcat_Houser   11/12/2012 7:00:15 PM
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3) Niche. A/V processing/encoding. I'm building a Win8/RADI 0-SSD box for this purpose, and this purpose solo. The rest of my world will live on Elder Intel Mac Mini's and Atom Net top computers for Skype and Email

rick merritt
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re: Consumers staying away from high-end PCs
rick merritt   11/12/2012 7:15:02 PM
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What a change. Long ago, you couldn't find a PC for less than $1,000! Intel used to regularly showcase emerging high performance apps that would need its next-gen CPU performance. They haven't said anything on that front in a while. These days the main apps are all about the Web so network not CPU performance is more key.

DWilde10
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re: Consumers staying away from high-end PCs
DWilde10   11/12/2012 7:36:26 PM
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[disclaimer: I work for Intel, but my opinions are my own and do not reflect the company's guidance] You *have* reported Intel's latest thrust in apps, Rick. Partnering with Nuance to make voice-driven PCs, and the whole Perceptual Computing initiative, for which a SDK was just released. Convertibles and dockable tablets with touch are just the beginning of the re-invention of the PC. Don't count us out quite yet. :D

Embedded SW Dev
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re: Consumers staying away from high-end PCs
Embedded SW Dev   11/12/2012 7:38:28 PM
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Intel's other problem is that when making a choice between a higher processor clock speed (or more cores) and more memory, more memory is almost always the right choice. A SSD might be above a faster CPU, but they are still too expensive for the $500 PC. Most CPUs have enough performance for the consumer workload, but browsers use lots of memory, and consumers only close a window when they reboot the machine.

Bert22306
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re: Consumers staying away from high-end PCs
Bert22306   11/12/2012 8:58:24 PM
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I have to disagree with those who assume that any status quo of today will remain the status quo for all time! Yes, we are in a strange phase now, where lots of casual users are buying up smartphones and tablets, and therefore the manufacturers of computing devices and software are dedicating a lot of time and effort to meet these demands. But it's also true that these handheld devices are approaching mid-level PCs in their computing power. Therefore, the only logical conclusion is that the current status quo will soon end, and the apps will be demanding more power from the handhelds, and consequently also putting upward pressure on PC hardware. After all, growth curves are always S curves. Handheld devices will also eventually saturate the market, and the device makers and software developers are going to want to have something new to sell. Innovation will not end.

tb1
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re: Consumers staying away from high-end PCs
tb1   11/13/2012 1:05:05 AM
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I can't imagine that desktops are going away (even if there are now lots of other options for non-power home users), and Microsoft Windows and office products look like they are going to continue to dominate the desktop. Considering Windows 8 provides a fuller experience with a touch screen (even on a desktop) I agree with the idea of the re-invention of the PC and I think it applies to the desktop as well.

horta1212
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re: Consumers staying away from high-end PCs
horta1212   11/13/2012 8:21:49 PM
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Bert, I'm impressed at your ability to see through the fog, look beyond the 'now', and state reality as it is. Your views seem neither biased nor radical compared to most others I've seen post on EETimes. From historical trends, you're applying concepts to still emerging markets (mobile) and concluding well before anyone's even thought about this, that the mobile market will see its bright light fade sooner than anyone expects. The only thing missing here is, what's next? People will have cheap, powerful, efficient, quality computing power. Will the computing industry turn into something like the memory industry? Those that aren't bringing down the costs will be pushed out rapidly because the margins will be so little? Any ideas on what you see coming, or even what you would like to see coming?

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