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HDD: not dead yet?

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David Ashton
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re: HDD: not dead yet?
David Ashton   11/5/2010 10:39:19 AM
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Thanks - nice appetite-whetter! Some IT-savvy friends have implemented SSDs for the OS and some apps and HDDs for their main storage and are pleased with the results. On question I have ref Hybrid drives would be - who decides what goes where? The synopsis of the Hybrid Drives paper (which you have no doubt read in full) shows a section on Automatic data placement - can you tell us more about how that works??

pica0
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re: HDD: not dead yet?
pica0   11/5/2010 7:42:45 AM
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As long as their cent/GByte metric is significally lower HDDs will not be retired.

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