Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Memory Designline Blog

Apple changing the game with memory

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
fdunn0
User Rank
Rookie
re: Apple changing the game with memory
fdunn0   11/30/2010 3:40:39 PM
NO RATINGS
Until Flash memory is replaced by something that doesn't wear it's really just an expensive fast HDD that is doomed to wear out. HP and another company are working on a resistive memory that is far faster and less prone to failure.

KB3001
User Rank
CEO
re: Apple changing the game with memory
KB3001   11/6/2010 11:40:56 AM
NO RATINGS
Indeed, it is just a question of when rather than whether SSD's will supplant HDDs.

robinjon
User Rank
Rookie
re: Apple changing the game with memory
robinjon   11/6/2010 9:03:41 AM
NO RATINGS
Here is an interesting analysis on apple's strategy: http://www.news.ivarta.com/Unstoppable-engine-innovation-Apple/550487.htm

ahshabazz
User Rank
Rookie
re: Apple changing the game with memory
ahshabazz   10/28/2010 4:57:12 AM
NO RATINGS
Battery life is rated at 35 watt-hours. Previous revisions of 13" MacBook Air machines have included 37 or 40 watt-hour battery packs. Since this Air has a smaller screen and lacks a spinning hard drive, where does all the extra battery-life go?

h3llphyre
User Rank
Rookie
re: Apple changing the game with memory
h3llphyre   10/26/2010 7:25:53 PM
NO RATINGS
@t.alex The lifespan of an SSD is really difficult to determine. It really depends on the application, vendor, and the actual end use. In a laptop, using the controller they are, for general computing, the life span will exceed that of a rotating disc storage device. Heat and vibration are killers to rotating media. SSDs are not bothered by such things (until you get over the temps that instantly kill a hard drive, then the SSD starts showing wear). Solid state, smart controllers with wear leveling, and higher quality NAND chips all leads to an excellent drive. The only problem is capacity for storage.

t.alex
User Rank
Rookie
re: Apple changing the game with memory
t.alex   10/26/2010 4:55:36 PM
NO RATINGS
It is quite common to see SSD nowadays, especially in netbooks. However, anyone comment on the lifetime of these SSD?

h3llphyre
User Rank
Rookie
re: Apple changing the game with memory
h3llphyre   10/25/2010 5:18:10 PM
NO RATINGS
@LarryM99 http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/MacBook-Air-11-Inch-Model-A1370-Teardown/3745/1 Check out the "heatsink". I am blown away that they can cool the CPU and GPU with that. As usual, Apple has done a fantastic job with the hardware design.

LarryM99
User Rank
CEO
re: Apple changing the game with memory
LarryM99   10/25/2010 4:16:06 PM
NO RATINGS
I was really interested in this announcement once I heard about the SSD focus. It's an example of Apple claiming an innovation which they really didn't come up with, but I though that as a vertical integrator they might do something instead of just the typical SATA interface. Has anyone seen a detailed teardown yet? From what I've seen of the performance numbers it looks pretty conventional. Larry M.

antiquus
User Rank
Rookie
re: Apple changing the game with memory
antiquus   10/25/2010 3:32:35 PM
NO RATINGS
Price being what it may be, the form factor of the rotating hard drive is not really good for the flash drive. Flash memory density is a function of chip size: a TSOP/BGA is what it is, and it is a packaging problem to fit that to the 3.5", 2.5" or 1.8" form factor of rotating disks and handle the heat from the memory. Capacity is dictated, and there is no room for innovation there. Further, the selected form factor is a defining element of the overall consumer product size and shape. A few dozen gigabytes is sufficient for most people, so talk about terabytes is misguided. By removing the traditional disk form factor, Apple gains a number of technical benefits. First, the shape of the product can be thinner, and the flash can be fitted to the nooks and crannies of the layout (e.g., the backside of the display), breaking the capacity barrier of the traditional drive packaging. By distributing the flash onto a larger surface, the thermal issues simply vanish, and reliability and data integrity improve. Breaking the form factor also allows the flash controller(s) to be integrated into other silicon, again making the product smaller and cheaper. And note that there is no longer an aftermarket replacement issue: no hard drive, no warehousing of spares; and the market is closed to 3rd-party enhancers (an eternal Apple goal). This is a one-time product with no user serviceable parts inside: no upgrade, no spares, no aftermarket, and in a few years you'll be buying another (presumably newer, better) one.

wilber_xbox
User Rank
Manager
re: Apple changing the game with memory
wilber_xbox   10/24/2010 9:07:24 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree with the ppl saying that price will command the market share in hard disk market. But with more laptop manufacturer providing the option to choose bt. SSD and HDD, SSD is surely the new kid for focus.

Page 1 / 3   >   >>
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Top Comments of the Week