Breaking News
The Engineering Life - Around the Web

Guns- A license to print

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 4 / 4
przemek
User Rank
Rookie
re: Guns- A license to print
przemek   8/2/2012 11:23:18 PM
NO RATINGS
Please correct me if I'm wrong but I think the lower receiver is the 'registered' part of the weapon, as far as ATF is concerned, i.e. where the serial number resides.

BruceP8
User Rank
Rookie
re: Guns- A license to print
BruceP8   8/2/2012 9:53:06 PM
NO RATINGS
I think we need to start thinking about methods and laws to control crazy people instead of trying to control everything that could potentially be dangerous, including printers, guns, cars, knives, propane bottles, etc...

xprmntl
User Rank
Rookie
re: Guns- A license to print
xprmntl   8/2/2012 6:15:33 PM
NO RATINGS
Blatant fear mongering. It will remain much easier to just buy one, legally, or illegally, for the foreseeable future.

jnissen
User Rank
Manager
re: Guns- A license to print
jnissen   8/2/2012 5:06:51 AM
NO RATINGS
A lower receiver is not a full gun. The upper receiver with barrel and bolt are the critical elements that need to contain the high pressures involved with the firearm. To say he printed a complete working gun is not even close to reality.

SylvieBarak
User Rank
Rookie
re: Guns- A license to print
SylvieBarak   8/2/2012 12:08:22 AM
NO RATINGS
The NRA is going to have a field day with this...

<<   <   Page 4 / 4
Most Recent Comments
_hm
 
David Ashton
 
Olaf Barheine
 
BobSnyder
 
elizabethsimon
 
seaEE
 
BobSnyder
 
NoviceMan
 
David Ashton
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
"All the King's horses and all the KIng's men gave up on Humpty, so they handed the problem off to Engineering."
5 comments
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Flash Poll
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
David Patterson, known for his pioneering research that led to RAID, clusters and more, is part of a team at UC Berkeley that recently made its RISC-V processor architecture an open source hardware offering. We talk with Patterson and one of his colleagues behind the effort about the opportunities they see, what new kinds of designs they hope to enable and what it means for today’s commercial processor giants such as Intel, ARM and Imagination Technologies.