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Open-Source Aquarium Automation: 5 DIY Systems

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rfindley
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Fish and chips
rfindley   2/5/2014 6:31:09 PM
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Caleb,

Thanks for sharing a peek into the world of aquarium automation.  I guess you could have called the article "fish and chips" :-)

These projects all look like great fun.  The aquascaping website was also really interesting.  Wow.. those are some labors of love!

I would be interested to hear more if you implement one of these systems (or your own) for your own aquarium.

Caleb Kraft
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Re: Fish and chips
Caleb Kraft   2/7/2014 9:56:08 AM
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right now I don't have anything automated but the lights with simple timers. I have a tendency to do simpler, less tempermental aquariums so I don't need to constantly monitor things like ph, salinity, etc.

andrew.oke
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Re: Fish and chips
andrew.oke   2/7/2014 10:17:36 PM
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Hi Caleb,

Thanks for posting about my project! I've actually been working on moving everything to surface mount (board is now called Arduarium Ultimate and available in the store) and am actually going to be releasing a version for the Raspberry Pi because it's got more horsepower to do some of the things I've been wanting to do.

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