Breaking News
Military & Aerospace Blog

What happens to the Apollo artifacts when space tourists touch down?

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
re: What happens to the Apollo artifacts when space tourists touch down?
Duane Benson   12/9/2011 11:24:45 PM
NO RATINGS
I suspect that it's more likely that the tourists will come, then the damage will occur, then more damage, then a rush for artifacts while NASA debates how to put a fence up and how to pay for it, then the fence, then bolt cutters. Then the ticket takers will show up.

David Ashton
User Rank
Blogger
re: What happens to the Apollo artifacts when space tourists touch down?
David Ashton   12/9/2011 10:28:32 PM
NO RATINGS
As soon as there are any tourists there, there will be fences around everything of interest.... ;-) And there will be someone there charging you a couple of dollars to go look... ;-))

Kristin Lewotsky
User Rank
Blogger
re: What happens to the Apollo artifacts when space tourists touch down?
Kristin Lewotsky   12/9/2011 10:00:15 PM
NO RATINGS
Ah, but if you read the legal opinion, space law does not have any provisions for presumption of abandonment, so those artifacts are not considered abandoned any more than a defunct satellite in orbit is. if an item is not abandoned, it cannot be legally salvaged. The United States government owns the artifacts, so if anybody took them it would be theft. That said, who's going to stop them? I suppose if somebody knew it was happening, they could track reentry and send out the Navy to intercept recovery vessels but the timing would be difficult if the organization in question wanted to hide what they were doing. More to the point, the resolution of current lunar imaging systems is not sharp enough to follow the activities of individuals, let alone see what's in their hands.

Top Comments of the Week
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
"All the King's horses and all the KIng's men gave up on Humpty, so they handed the problem off to Engineering."
5 comments
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
David Patterson, known for his pioneering research that led to RAID, clusters and more, is part of a team at UC Berkeley that recently made its RISC-V processor architecture an open source hardware offering. We talk with Patterson and one of his colleagues behind the effort about the opportunities they see, what new kinds of designs they hope to enable and what it means for today’s commercial processor giants such as Intel, ARM and Imagination Technologies.
Flash Poll