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DoD to pull plug on Airborne Laser Test Bed?

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RYET
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re: DoD to pull plug on Airborne Laser Test Bed?
RYET   1/6/2012 3:35:20 AM
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In WWII engineers used fragile tube technology and built a radio fuse that could be fired from a canon at several thousand G's. It was not a matter of money but dire need.They have done quite well from the first laser to what they have now.Never underestimate mans inventiveness.

Kristin Lewotsky
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re: DoD to pull plug on Airborne Laser Test Bed?
Kristin Lewotsky   1/5/2012 8:34:18 PM
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Hi Jose, Good point about unlimited power on an aircraft carrier, but what about the shock and vibration, as well as the salt air environment? with solid-state lasers, you don't have to worry about positioning cavity mirrors, but you do have to worry about coupling optics -- that means you have to worry about not just positioning but coating degradation or contamination. My other question is power. You can couple together a lot of diode lasers to get kilowatts but what about tens of megawatts? If the system can pull that off, you've got to find a way to dissipate an awful lot of heat or system lifetime is going to shorten dramatically. I expect that some engineer somewhere is going to figure that out, and when they do, my hat goes off to them – it will be an impressive feat.

Jose_engineer
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re: DoD to pull plug on Airborne Laser Test Bed?
Jose_engineer   1/5/2012 6:41:05 PM
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Looking at my previous message, spelling might be though!!!! Ha, Ha!!!

Jose_engineer
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re: DoD to pull plug on Airborne Laser Test Bed?
Jose_engineer   1/5/2012 6:39:19 PM
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An aircraft carrier has unlimmited power. they have plenty of room to accomodate any size laser. Laser energy moves at the speek of light. One missile can destroy a multibillion dollar investment like an aircraft carrier. Twenty years ago to produce 1 Watt of otical power required a wahing-machine sized monstrosity. Now a laser diode can easily do that in the size of my thumb, including electronics. 100's of Watts are easily achievable in far less size than a wahing-machine, with solid state realiability. It sounds to me like it's worth looking in to, but should we leave it to the government to manage the effort. That's another story. Technology is never the hardest part of the problem.

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