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Buckyballs may be hazardous to your DNA

12/19/2005 02:00 PM EST
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Polyspace
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re: Buckyballs may be hazardous to your DNA
Polyspace   11/16/2012 10:02:05 PM
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This is interesting. Computer simulations say Buckyballs may cause damage to DNA, while experimental data suggests it could prolong life, doubling the lifespan of rats in this case: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0142961212003237 via: http://gizmodo.com/5902703/bucky-balls-could-double-your-lifespan I'd love to see a few independent researchers verifying the results.

Nicholas.Lee
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re: Buckyballs may be hazardous to your DNA
Nicholas.Lee   11/16/2012 10:31:23 PM
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DNA does not float around loose in the body, it is protected by the wall of the nucleus and then by the cell wall itself. A C60 buckyball would be too big to get through either membrane, so I'm not too concerned by this anti-nanotech scaremongering. Ordinary candle soot contains C60 buckyball molecules and that doesn't exactly mutate people into X-men does it.

harris38
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RE:Buckyballs may be hazardous to your DNA
harris38   12/9/2013 4:49:47 AM
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CPSC's goal is no longer to protect kids from bite-sized magnets — BuckyBalls are off the market. Their only goal now is to personally destroy Zucker for daring to question ridiculous federal bureaucrats. 

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