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EEs explain rogue waves

12/14/2007 07:00 PM EST
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Mark Ferrers
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re: EEs explain rogue waves
Mark Ferrers   1/10/2008 12:05:24 AM
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You say: "Rogue waves as high as a 10-story building have been offered as an explanation for the disappearance of ships as big as an ocean liner, despite the lack of survivors to tell the tale." Oh yeah? Name one.

Quantum Fusion
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re: EEs explain rogue waves
Quantum Fusion   1/1/2008 6:09:02 PM
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The rogue wave phenomenon is responsible for what is known as ‚??Cold Fusion‚?Ě. The ‚??Cold Fusion‚?Ě phenomenon is NOT Deuterium Deuterium fusion as reported. The ‚??rogue wave‚?Ě phenomenon causes compression of the lattice elements containing hydrogen ions. When the Hamiltonian of a single lattice element containing one or more hydrogen ions exceeds 782KeV, a hydrogen ion undergoes electron capture as a natural energy reduction mechanism. The ‚??rogue wave‚?Ě then dissipates, resulting in very cold neutrons that bind with other ions in the lattice. Profusion Energy already has multiple repeatable control systems that reliably produce fusion energy in an open container by harnessing the ‚??rogue wave‚?Ě phenomenon. An investment of $500K will secure the lab personal and equipment necessary to collect hard calorimeter data on energy production from the processes. An investment of $2M will complete the data collection necessary to begin product development. WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO SCIENCE? The scientific community is refusing to accept papers on anything that even sounds related to cold fusion. By ignoring the mounting evidence, the scientific community is missing the opportunity to solve the mounting global energy crisis. For more information contact PA122907 at profusionenergy.com

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