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Oracle snatches Sun Microsystems for $7.4 billion

4/20/2009 12:00 PM EDT
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KS67
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re: Oracle snatches Sun Microsystems for $7.4 billion
KS67   4/21/2009 2:48:06 AM
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Mar. 18: IBM+Sun= "Makes sense... This is about customer acquistion, not technology" Apr. 20: IBM announces 11% revenue decline. Looks like some key, big-spending customers (e.g. banks) are cutting back? Apr. 20: Oracle offers a compelling plan of how to add Sun valuing it as a complement that will build-up a strong, full-featured competitor to IBM & HP and, maybe even Cisco. This plan wins (despite the expected brutal job cuts) because it shows an optimistic view of what to do with a strong technology player that has lost of some of its viability as a must-have solution provider. Together with Sun, Oracle now can grow into new markets that IBM & HP have to themselves. Oracle is the entrepreneurs choice - way to go Ellison.

dirk.bruere
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re: Oracle snatches Sun Microsystems for $7.4 billion
dirk.bruere   4/20/2009 6:03:31 PM
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And here we were all rooting for a Microsoft takeover so that Java could finally be standardized. Just kidding:-)

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