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UWB startup Radiospire folds

4/21/2009 07:00 PM EDT
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rfic_dog
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re: UWB startup Radiospire folds
rfic_dog   4/24/2009 5:13:20 PM
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Standards are a big deal in radiospire's market. Although it's fine to have a proprietary closed-ecosystem product (i.e. a pair of boxes, one each for a TX & STB); in order for them to succeed as a company & get further funding, they need a roadmap which will get them integrated w/in a STB and TV. The TV folks still spec for a 20year product lifecycle -- any proprietary solution (including amimon) is by default a concept demo until a standard exists which can outlive the company. 802.11 & WUSB are still possible here if the upper-layer SW protocols can be standardized and/or the solution made field-upgradable. Also, price-point needs to be *much* less than $300 ... perhaps $50/side.

AnonMan
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re: UWB startup Radiospire folds
AnonMan   4/21/2009 10:20:00 PM
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Ummm - in 2005/6 when they started, what -standards- were there for R/S to build to? Even today, there are no "standards" that support the bandwidths (~1.5Gb/s) they were running. This company had a solid technology/product and still couldn't get funding to see it through. That says something about our economy.

rick merritt
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re: UWB startup Radiospire folds
rick merritt   4/21/2009 9:49:51 PM
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Thanks for the clarification, Mike. I'd love to hear opinions from any system makers on wireless USB.

rick merritt
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re: UWB startup Radiospire folds
rick merritt   4/21/2009 9:49:51 PM
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Thanks for the clarification, Mike. I'd love to hear opinions from any system makers on wireless USB.

mkrell
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re: UWB startup Radiospire folds
mkrell   4/21/2009 9:26:39 PM
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Actually Radiospire's failure was also due to at least a couple other issue. Their first product was a US only 3-5GHz proprietary technology that never caught on. After that failed they tried to do a restart at 60GHz and got caught up in that technology that as of right now has 5 different standards. Just goes to show you that standards do count. Also, as a clarification the WiMedia Alliance did not fold in March. WiMedia transferred it's technology to the USB-IF and BT-SIG in March for further spec development and deployment. The WiMedia Alliance will close in October on the current schedule.

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