Breaking News
News & Analysis

Sun scolds NAND makers, slams SSDs

Sun scolds NAND makers, slams SSDs
8/12/2009 00:00 AM EDT
2 comments
NO RATINGS
Page 1 / 2 Next >
More Related Links
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Seaside
User Rank
Rookie
re: Sun scolds NAND makers, slams SSDs
Seaside   8/14/2009 8:43:42 PM
NO RATINGS
I understand Sun's frustration, and I'm sure NAND suppliers will respond to this opportunity. However, price and availability of memory products are always related. When both the price and the availability are a major issue, it's not always the fault of the suppliers if the OEM BOM is out of sync.

John Hennessy
User Rank
Rookie
re: Sun scolds NAND makers, slams SSDs
John Hennessy   8/12/2009 10:18:38 PM
NO RATINGS
I find the phrase "lithography death march" very appropriate. We hear that Moore's Law will cease to operate in maybe 2014; wrong in my opinion. It has already ground to a halt and did so roughly in 2007. Further shrinks may be technologically possible. Bigger wafers may also be possible. But - the end user demand has ceased and the price of innovation is now such that the number of players, in both the equipment and fab areas is heading towards literally a handful. It has been an amazing, world-changing ride, but all technologies hit an end-point. This recession marks then end-point for silicon-based logic. I am, of course being a bit inflamatory, just to sparc debate

August Cartoon Caption Winner!
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
"All the King's horses and all the KIng's men gave up on Humpty, so they handed the problem off to Engineering."
5 comments
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Flash Poll
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
David Patterson, known for his pioneering research that led to RAID, clusters and more, is part of a team at UC Berkeley that recently made its RISC-V processor architecture an open source hardware offering. We talk with Patterson and one of his colleagues behind the effort about the opportunities they see, what new kinds of designs they hope to enable and what it means for today’s commercial processor giants such as Intel, ARM and Imagination Technologies.