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Intel, Numonyx claim phase-change memory milestone

10/28/2009 05:00 PM EDT
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mark.lapedus
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re: Intel, Numonyx claim phase-change memory milestone
mark.lapedus   11/4/2009 6:13:47 AM
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Solster, I have written tomes about PCM. Those articles, which are objective, are written and posted in the news section. Those articles are mostly positive. This is a blog; I can state my opinion here. In my opinion, I am no big fan of PCM. PCM has gotten too much hype. There is no evidence of any sales for PCM. Intel has introduced the same part 20 (or more) times. We have published all 20 versions. Here's what I'm wondering: When will Phantom Change Memory gain traction?

dag_in_va
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re: Intel, Numonyx claim phase-change memory milestone
dag_in_va   11/3/2009 1:23:31 PM
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Try this link. http://www.google.com/patents/about?id=ZbLIAAAAEBAJ&dq=7589343

Solster
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re: Intel, Numonyx claim phase-change memory milestone
Solster   11/1/2009 1:54:29 AM
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To Mark LePedus: So, you are an editor. Conventional wisdom says an editor's job doesn't quite involve calling names to the subject of the articles they publish. Unless of course, their intent is to write in stone that their publication is really a tabloid. If you don't believe in the credibility of a press release or technology, do not report it. Someone else will.

dag_in_va
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re: Intel, Numonyx claim phase-change memory milestone
dag_in_va   10/31/2009 10:15:43 PM
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better link on OTS http://www.ovonic.com/PDFs/MRS_fall2003_tutorials/sro_mrs_fall2003_tutorial_120103.pdf

mark.lapedus
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re: Intel, Numonyx claim phase-change memory milestone
mark.lapedus   10/30/2009 12:40:12 AM
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My take: PCM = Phase-change memory Or is it this? Phantom-change memory or phony-change memory. We keep writing about PCM, but it's still an R&D project. Is anyone out there seeing PCM in volumes? BAE Systems is said to have seen some samples. Nokia wants it. Any OEMs gotten their hands on it?

toom_tabard
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re: Intel, Numonyx claim phase-change memory milestone
toom_tabard   10/29/2009 9:35:38 PM
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I see. This chalcogenide electronic bistable switch is then in series with the PCM chalcogenide that changes state structurally. Seems ingenious. I look forward to their presentation.

dag_in_va
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re: Intel, Numonyx claim phase-change memory milestone
dag_in_va   10/29/2009 8:22:47 PM
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OTS is not a diode. It is a new phase change switching technology that was patented by the inventor of PCM - Stan Ovshinsky. See for example U.S. patent #5,330,630

toom_tabard
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re: Intel, Numonyx claim phase-change memory milestone
toom_tabard   10/29/2009 5:15:17 PM
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Bri227, it will be interesting to see what their OTS actually is but I suspect it may just be a way of describing a diode. If you look at Samsung's 2005 IEDM paper (Baek et al.), they integrated thin film Ni-oxide and Ti-oxide to make selection diodes to their metal oxide switch for 3D memory. Unfortunately, these diodes had a maximum current drivability that was at least 3 orders of magnitude too small to deliver the current needed for resetting the material from low resistance to high resistance. PCM (at least in the literature) needs hundreds of microamps to reset which is not only a tall order for any 3D switch (i.e. diode) but also impacts the reset bandwidth (number of cells being reset per second).

Bri227
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re: Intel, Numonyx claim phase-change memory milestone
Bri227   10/29/2009 9:38:51 AM
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Toom, if my read of this article is correct, they are using a thin film selection device instead of a stacked diode. They do not need a stacked diode. They are using a thin film device in place of a stacked diode.

toom_tabard
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re: Intel, Numonyx claim phase-change memory milestone
toom_tabard   10/29/2009 4:36:33 AM
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Good idea Dylan. Turns out there aren't that many to choose from: (1) 3D versions of some switchable material such as PCM (Numonyx), Perovskite (Unity), Simple metal oxide (SanDisk, Toshiba), solid-state electrolyte (Axon) (2) NAND string in "horizontal direction" i.e. parallel with wafer plane, such as regular floating gate NAND (Samsung), TANOS (Samsung), SONOS with barrier engineering (Macronix), Dual-gate TFT SONOS (Schiltron) (3) NAND string in "vertical direction" such as BiCS (Toshiba) and VRAT (Samsung). Each approach has its advantages and disadvantages. The problem for the readers will be to discern the real state of affairs through all the hype that will grow and grow with the approaching NAND Flash brick wall.

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