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Bluetooth group drops ultrawideband, eyes 60 GHz

10/29/2009 00:00 AM EDT
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AlexKovnat
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re: Bluetooth group drops ultrawideband, eyes 60 GHz
AlexKovnat   4/9/2010 12:55:40 PM
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I wish those performing research in this area, all the best in ironing out the problems with 60 GHz technology. Actually, frequencies in the tens of GHz range have many applications. In automotive technology, 77 GHz radar enables adaptive cruise control. And in an article in Vertiflite, the American Helicopter Society's quarterly membership magazine a year or so ago, there was an article about Sandblaster, a radar system operating at 94 GHz. This system would enable a helicopter to land amidst clouds of dust kicked up by rotor downwash when landing in off-airport environments. In Europe, there was (and I hope still is) a project called Kokon, which aims to develop automotive radars in the 79+ GHz region. The reason why millimeter wave radars operate at 35 or 94 GHz, btw, is because of atmospheric "windows" at those frequencies. 60 GHz is good for short range applications not only in spite of, but perhaps precisely because atmospheric absorption at that frequency would prevent neighboring short-range networks from interfering with one another.

rick merritt
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re: Bluetooth group drops ultrawideband, eyes 60 GHz
rick merritt   11/4/2009 12:48:02 AM
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The IP and power issues are very real. But the overarching question for me is whether 60 GHz is following, in part, the same path that led ultrawideband into trouble.

Santhoff
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re: Bluetooth group drops ultrawideband, eyes 60 GHz
Santhoff   11/3/2009 12:49:24 AM
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One of the 60 GHz solutions (SiBeam) calls for a RF output of 10 Watts for a PAN! Is that the Bluetooth's SIG's idea of low power? 60 GHz on battery operated device?

ArunB3D
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re: Bluetooth group drops ultrawideband, eyes 60 GHz
ArunB3D   11/2/2009 9:59:21 AM
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While I don't know if it's true that "virtually all" agreed as Roberto claims, I agree with him that it seems to naive (if not disingenious) to expect anything better for 60GHz. Even assuming that they did somehow manage to bypass royalties for 60GHz Bluetooth by mircle, surely most chips supporting that protocol will actually be multi-standard, and so the chips themselves might not escape royalty payments no matter what the Bluetooth SIG does.

robertoaiello
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re: Bluetooth group drops ultrawideband, eyes 60 GHz
robertoaiello   10/29/2009 1:16:22 PM
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I don't understand the logic behind the zero-royalty issue and I am a little surprised by the crude comment about the market of zero units. Virtually all WiMedia members and companies with an IP position in UWB are also Bluetooth members, and as such they have agreed to zero royalty in the Bluetooth SIG. This sounds like someone in the SIG is confused or uses the issue as an excuse. The same IP issue will apply to any 60GHz standards, because Ecma, IEEE and virtually all other organizations are not royalty free, because most companies, including Bluetooth Board members, haven't joined zero royalty based industry alliances in recently.

rick merritt
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re: Bluetooth group drops ultrawideband, eyes 60 GHz
rick merritt   10/29/2009 3:17:03 AM
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Is 60 GHz technology in danger from an industry clash? Should the two 60 GHz efforts--WirelessHD/IEEE 802.15.3c and Wireless Gigabit Alliance/IEEE802.11ad--get together?

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