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U.S.: Fake parts threaten electronic market

2/17/2010 04:00 PM EST
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Steven I
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re: U.S.: Fake parts threaten electronic market
Steven I   3/3/2010 9:29:10 PM
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ddeisz, that should be the general rule to follow and it should be strictly enforced. However, with military contracts requiring long term support, it is not always possible. Therefore, as Phil stated, you need to find a supplier that specializes in counterfeit detection techniques. The test house will broker the parts, perform any and all tests that you require and submit a report to you. The great thing is that you never pay for them unless they pass the testing. We have had great success with that approach and we do get many failures during testing, so the test houses are honest.

KirkMc
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re: U.S.: Fake parts threaten electronic market
KirkMc   2/25/2010 6:01:27 PM
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When I was working at JPL a failure analysis of some parts revealed they were generic and not JAN parts although they were marked as such. Fortunately in this case the perp was identified but I thought he needed far worse punishment. RICOH needs to be automatically invoked in these cases, time needs to be 10 years no parole instead of 18 months with early release. Counterfeit bolts were involved in the Chicago airliner crash a few years back. That was murder and should have been convicted as such. And international cooperation must be INSISTED upon. Only a sociopath would counterfeit high tensile bolts. Goes beyond greed.

Etmax
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re: U.S.: Fake parts threaten electronic market
Etmax   2/24/2010 12:35:32 PM
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I had an assembly that needed an MGP20N40CL and got a local board loader to source and place the component. Turned out the entire batch would not operate at 5V gate drive but rather needed 10V All I can say is what do you expect when you give your technology to a bunch of counterfeiters. The Asian suppliers aren't the only ones that were chasing a quick buck. The companies that outsourced their wafer assembly, and in some cases their entire production are just as guilty.

ryankenny
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re: U.S.: Fake parts threaten electronic market
ryankenny   2/18/2010 9:38:49 PM
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Users and integrators of these counterfeit devices don't care if they are counterfeit -- as long as they work. Just like users with 'Bots' on their computers don't care, as long as their computer works. Either make them care, or they will only address the problem up to their threshold of pain (when the parts DON'T work).

NorthshorePhil
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re: U.S.: Fake parts threaten electronic market
NorthshorePhil   2/18/2010 4:49:04 PM
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Every MFG needs a good broker to survive. Esp in these days of allocation. The broker you choose will determine the quality of parts you get. It's all about protection and avoidance. OEMS must buy from Brokers certified CCAP-101, have Scanning Acoustic Microscope /DECAP/XRAY/CURVETRACE ect in house...like our company...our customers have never felt more assured on orders. You cant stop china/counterfeiters. Their govt looks the other way. You cant stop using a broker, your business will suffer greatly. You can be smart about where you buy from. Phil NSComps

ddeisz
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re: U.S.: Fake parts threaten electronic market
ddeisz   2/17/2010 6:41:54 PM
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What about recommending buying only from authorized distributors who are both authorized AND have traceability for every part?

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