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ARM Web site powered, in part, by ARM cores

5/3/2010 06:00 PM EDT
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rick merritt
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re: ARM Web site powered, in part, by ARM cores
rick merritt   5/8/2010 4:13:29 PM
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I'd love to hear any informed analysis of the trade offs between Xeon, Atom and ARM servers.

Johnxhf
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re: ARM Web site powered, in part, by ARM cores
Johnxhf   5/7/2010 12:38:48 AM
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That's true. Tilera is the pioneer and hero in two-dimentional CPU arch research. But TBH that is not born for comparision with ARM or ATOM. Intel can also be capabile of up to 80 cores as of their recent research. What discussed here is the traditional CPU and as Duane mentioned, they mostly need now is the experience in this segment.

Duane Benson
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re: ARM Web site powered, in part, by ARM cores
Duane Benson   5/6/2010 9:14:41 PM
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Even if this is a long-term play, it's a great case of ARM eating their own dog-food (that's a compliment, but looking at the phrase written here, it doesn't really look like it). If they want to be in the server business, I don't see a better way then starting to use their own chips now and learning from the experience.

peterliang
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re: ARM Web site powered, in part, by ARM cores
peterliang   5/4/2010 5:01:57 AM
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TILERA already can integrate 100 core in one chip, Every core can offer the same performance like ARM or ATOM.

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