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Bleak prospects seen for mobile WiMax

6/23/2008 10:00 AM EDT
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Jacomo
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re: Bleak prospects seen for mobile WiMax
Jacomo   6/23/2008 5:56:33 PM
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DM you are dead on. These folks have been eating Ericsons food on LTE. The WiMAX technology is far superior to LTE as it relates to a Data Centric (IP) Broadband Wireless Network. WiMAX is not targetted at the Switched VOice Services like LTE must be-most of their revenues are in voice. Real world deployment of a serious LTE network is really in the 2012-2013 time frame. The only thing WiMAX is missing today is a solid 4G capable spectrum. 2.5Ghz is too limited for anything other then serious PTP fixed Broadband Wireless-where it will dominate. The sooner they link up with their new partners (the MSO) and gain access to its AWS (1700 & 2100Mhz) spectrum the sooner they will be able to be competitive in the Rural and Suburban markets-Foliage will kill 2.5Ghz any Wireless Mobile services and force Clearwire to focus on urban canyons initially. LTE will be wagged by the Voice segment at the expense of Data/Video. Jim

dmjossel
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re: Bleak prospects seen for mobile WiMax
dmjossel   6/23/2008 12:55:14 PM
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This article, just like nearly every other WiMax-related statement from F&S, is sheer nonsense. Looks like they have been retained to make the business case for LTE, rather than actually look at what is going on. LTE deployments next year? You have to be kidding me. The spec isn't even finished yet. No certifications have been begun. No interoperability tests have been performed. Real LTE infrastructure and devices are two years away at an absolute minimum. The remark about IPR is pure FU. The formation of patent alliance is a good thing and should prevent royalties from becoming too high a percentage of device costs, as is the case with GSM, or keeping operators and manufacturers locked into a single chipset vendor, as is the case with CDMA. The remarks try to make as if it sound as if the necessity of such an alliance is a bad thing-- as if it didn't exist with other technologies. WiMax must have Wave 2 rollouts this year or else it fails? That's convenient, since the Wave 2 certification was just finished a scant few weeks ago and the certified devices are only now hitting the market. Dual mode WiFi/Cellular phones exist? Yes, they sure do. Does that spell doom for WiMax? I honestly don't see how. The presence of Wifi as a local network alternative to the WWAN has no impact on the fact that for broadband, WiMax makes a better WWAN than 2.5G regardless of the technology used, and better than 3G for many applications, and as good or better than LTE for some, which isn't even here yet. WiMax Forum attendees agreed it is not optimized for simultaneous voice and data? What does that even mean for a technology that, unlike LTE, is built from the ground up to be packet-switched and offers multiple levels of QoS for any services you run on top of IP, including VOIP? Any operator for whom voice services are a factor are going to run an IMS solution (or any LTE operator, for that matter) and that means you have dynamic QoS. Not having to handle legacy circuit-switched networks is a bonus, not a fault-- and the last time I looked, most 2.5G networks were also not that great about handling simultaneous voice and data. The use of MIMO in 802.11 is completely irrelevant. MIMO increases throughput, not coverage, and 802.11 is still a LAN technology not a WAN technology. Seamless handoffs from cell to WiMax-- why would you need them? WiMax is targeted at greenfield operators, wired operators without wireless networks, operators who skipped 3G and want to offer broadband without waiting for LTE, or those who want to overlay a true wireless broadband network on top of their existing cellular infrastructure. In none of these scenarios is such call handoffs, from VOIP on WiMax to the voice bearer of GSM or CDMA, a real requirement. It's just another straw man set up to show how WiMax can't deliver. Frost and Sullivan is doing a nice hatchet job on WiMax. Which LTE vendor is footing the bill?

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