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Update: Qimonda files for insolvency

1/23/2009 08:00 AM EST
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CLiHsing
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re: Update: Qimonda files for insolvency
CLiHsing   1/25/2009 9:19:57 PM
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As I have said many times before, Winbond of Taiwan is doing well while using Qimonda technology and remains the best of the Taiwan DRAM companies, with revenues even increasing in December. The have just announced that mass production has started at 65nm using buried wordline technology licensed from Qimonda. Some of Winbond's engineers in Taiwan do complain about the low salaries though. In DRAM production, the one with the lowest cost wins.

CLiHsing
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re: Update: Qimonda files for insolvency
CLiHsing   1/23/2009 10:58:50 PM
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Qimonda is the worst run, most irrationally managed DRAM company. They created the DRAM mess in Taiwan by creating ProMOS and Inotera, and licensing technology to Winbond and Nanya. These four companies are now competitors of Qimonda. Furthermore, Qimonda is unable to temporarily shut down fabs or send workers home for several weeks the way Micron, Toshiba, and ST Microelectronics have done. This trouble may have been caused by the labor unions in Germany. The wages in Germany are also among the highest in the world. If, with a restructuring, they can move the fabs to Asia or Portugal, that would be a good thing. Qimonda should not accept subsidies to stay in Germany. The "law of comparative advantage" (see your Economics 101 text book) applied here means commodities like DRAM should not be made in Germany.

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