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Transistor-laser breaks Kirchhoff's Law, rewrites textbooks

5/14/2010 03:26 PM EDT
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Polarisgt
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re: Transistor-laser breaks Kirchhoff's Law, rewrites textbooks
Polarisgt   5/14/2010 9:37:41 PM
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I was lured by the eye-catching title to finish reading in the hope of learning the biggest discovery in post-Einstein era, only to be bored and insulted by the self-acclaimed accomplishment that does not fool anyone beyond their high school years. What a shame and negative example for diligent researchers and engineers.

HankWalker
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re: Transistor-laser breaks Kirchhoff's Law, rewrites textbooks
HankWalker   5/14/2010 7:38:56 PM
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Somehow we have managed all these years to analyze circuits containing LEDs and diode lasers without the need for new laws. I question the novelty of anything that needs this much hype.

emrah
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re: Transistor-laser breaks Kirchhoff's Law, rewrites textbooks
emrah   5/14/2010 3:06:30 PM
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Nothing new. Yet another reason to rename KCL to KQL (Kirchoff's Charge Law). Charge is always preserved even if it is converted to a laser beam. Simple accounting, no of electrons preserved in a closed circuit.

RobDinsmore
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re: Transistor-laser breaks Kirchhoff's Law, rewrites textbooks
RobDinsmore   5/14/2010 2:37:37 PM
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I really hate the way some scientists use bogus hype to gain some media attention. This oversexing of results was one of the main reasons I wanted to go into industry instead of staying in academia. In industry you only really need to get something to work and understand enough about it to keep it working long enough to meet the needs of the application. With science reporting you get ridiculous statements like this, and the one earlier this weak claiming a single grad student could produce more logic with DNA than the entire semiconductor industry regardless of the fact that there was no plan in place to actually "wire up" these logic elements and put them into a package that could actually end up in a device. Charge is always conserved even when it comes to black holes.

artificialvision
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re: Transistor-laser breaks Kirchhoff's Law, rewrites textbooks
artificialvision   5/14/2010 10:09:29 AM
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> "New text books will be needed to incorporate the transistor laser," said Feng. > "Kirchhoff's Current Law should be redefined as Kirchhoff 's Current and Energy Law." This is nonsense. For most circuit design purposes, the seeming "loss" of energy is completely irrelevant, because it is the Kirchhoff Current Law and Kirchhoff Voltage Law that lie at the heart of (analog) circuit simulation and circuit analysis. Conversion into light is in this respect only a side-effect, just as the universal conversion into heat is. There is zero loss of charge in the generation of laser light or heat. Kirchhoff's Current Law still holds, and conventional analysis and simulation techniques still apply. Action-at-a-distance (e.g., via light) can be properly modeled through nonlinear controlled sources without violating Kirchhoff's Current Law in any way. Regards

elPresidente
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re: Transistor-laser breaks Kirchhoff's Law, rewrites textbooks
elPresidente   5/14/2010 8:07:49 AM
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Big deal. III-V transistors emitted light when dinosaurs still walked the earth. And there's no need to rewrite Kirchoff's law either, as that great self-promoter Dr Feng postulates. I submit Feng's transistor model/symbol is faulty and is missing a current sink node that accounts for the E/O conversion of current, much the same as an optical detector is modeled by adding a current source to a node. With that, don't burn your college texts just yet. It's just hype, IMO.

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