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Reflections from SanDisk CEO Harari

8/18/2010 08:32 PM EDT
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DrQuine
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re: Reflections from SanDisk CEO Harari
DrQuine   8/19/2010 7:55:15 PM
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People have a huge appetite for storage capacity, especially as they expand their personal music and video libraries. Consumers are also very price sensitive, want smaller devices, and expect high reliability with high speed responses. When SSDs have higher capacity, smaller form factors, lower cost, higher speeds, and more reliability than the alternatives they will take over. In the meantime, reliability considerations (especially the lack of rotating media that are damaged by vibration or impact) will favor deployment of SSD technologies into premium mobile devices.

double-o-nothing
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re: Reflections from SanDisk CEO Harari
double-o-nothing   8/19/2010 7:29:04 AM
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Any established technology is hard to replace, no matter how good its alternatives look. NAND is really hard to replace, but even NAND in SSDs can't replace HDDs. 193 nm lithography is hard to replace, even after many years of work on EUV. It's too different, like GaAs vs. silicon. GaAs never replaced silicon even though it was faster and better.

mark.lapedus
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re: Reflections from SanDisk CEO Harari
mark.lapedus   8/19/2010 6:12:07 AM
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SSDs have yet to take off in the mass market. Why? Anybody know?

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