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SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business

8/20/2010 06:23 PM EDT
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dougcp444
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
dougcp444   10/19/2010 3:09:49 AM
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I think the ones with IP, like STEC, Sandforce, Sandisk, will survive and/or be bought

dougcp444
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
dougcp444   10/19/2010 3:06:53 AM
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It's already been happening, I think. You can't find a major, and maybe minor, OEM (HP, IBM, EMC, Oracle, Dell, and many smaller OEMs) that do not have SSDs in their large product lines. I think if you took a tour of these companies product announcements of this year you might be pretty surprised. I would expect to see SSDs in many cloud architectures, too.

katgod
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
katgod   8/26/2010 6:29:41 PM
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I saw three SSD comments that need further exploration. One, crashing disk drive because of airline turbulence, are there known instances of this? Two, longer run time in portable computers, while this is a true statement what is the actual run time increase in average use. Three, are the new low noise HDDs really a problem for a home media center, I can just barely hear my drive when it is on my lap in my home, I am curious if a newer HDD in a box would be heard while listening to most source material. Yes, this might be a nice marketing feature for a high end home media center where cost would be less of an issue.

resistion
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
resistion   8/26/2010 6:54:46 AM
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The trouble is the SSD ATA interface only allows them to be marketed as HDD replacement. So you have to wait for everyone to be so unsatisfied with HDDs even at their lowest cost/bit that they will throw them out for something for expensiver, but lighter, faster, power-saving, etc. This takes too much time. SSD makers need to switch to an interface that allows HDD users to keep using HDDs while investigating the possibility of solid-state storage independently. The USB interface might be a good place to start. Capacities of 64 GB already available.

mark.lapedus
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
mark.lapedus   8/26/2010 5:54:14 AM
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I received an interesting e-mail on SSDs. This commentary comes from Walker Blount, an analyst with Web-Feet Research: ''SSDs and flash storage appliances improving enterprise performance is dependent on the applications that are run and the architecture they are being deployed in. Usage patterns also factor into the mix where read intensive, write intensive, IOPs and bandwidth may be requirements of the application. Enterprise applications can be reduced to four fundamental areas: E-Business, Financial, Web searches, and Video. In each of these areas, understanding the application’s usage patterns becomes an important factor when deploying SSDs. In E-business and financial applications; On-Line Transactions (OLT), Analysis and Data Mining requires fast response times requiring low latencies. SSDs have this attribute whereas enterprise hard disk drives do not. Video applications such as Video on Demand, Webcasting, and Medical imaging requires high bandwidths to move large amounts of sequential data for viewing, which again are SSD attributes. ''SSDs and flash storage appliances in the enterprise are being deployed where enterprise hard drives dominate. They will either replace some or augment enterprise hard disk drives in the tiered storage environment. Determining where they will be deployed will depend on where the performance and cost benefit is best whether it is in application servers and/or network storage in the SAN environment. ''With the continued pressure for improved performance, reduced footprint, and reduced power consumption, IT managers must consider SSDs and flash storage appliances as performance and storage solutions. They will be challenged to find the best fit for these devices to provide the best performance and cost benefit for their enterprise applications and customers.''

mark.lapedus
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
mark.lapedus   8/26/2010 12:09:12 AM
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We all agree SSDs have a place. Should they be marketed better by the OEMS? If so, how would you market an SSD to expand the sales for these items?

jimcondon
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jimcondon   8/25/2010 12:28:17 PM
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MeirG, Great point on the Home Entertainment Center PC. Noise is another issue that people overlook as an advantage. I remember the first time I walked in one of my customer's offices that was outfitted with Silent PCs (no fans, SSD). I was stunned with how quiet it was and how much noise we take for granted out of our computers.

MeirG
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
MeirG   8/25/2010 9:58:32 AM
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There are two markets that I didn't see addressed: 1) The Home Entertainment Center PC: There, audible noise is my main concern. I don't want that when I listen to Elly Ameling singing Gretchen am spinnrade. And here, the competition is the cost of a "silent" PC enclosure. Have you seen the prices of these? And the home entertainment is not a niche market... 2) As a cache: IMHO, there is a slot between Main DRAM and HDD. It will than join the long chain from level-1 through 3 SRAM cache, SSD as the virtual memory and up to a robotic tape machine at the extreme off-line edge. What say you folks?

unknown multiplier
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
unknown multiplier   8/24/2010 3:31:10 PM
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Yes, I agree totally. In 5 years, I think all of my internet downloads and media files will not be on a desktop or notebook.

sjprg
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
sjprg   8/24/2010 1:26:09 PM
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At present I have two Intel X25-V in raid 0 in my desktop and a Vertex turbo in my laptop. I see SATA as a dead end for SSD with the future being PCI-E as the interface. Examining the Vertex Z series drives this is what I envision the future of SSD in the marketplace. With the advent of PCI-E 3 The HDD bottle neck may finaly be broken and external terrabyte will be USB3.

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