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Report finds no increased cancer risk at Greenock fab

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8/24/2010 01:03 PM EDT
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pconti
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re: Report finds no increased cancer risk at Greenock fab
pconti   9/1/2011 12:33:43 AM
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Funny how the HSE found more cases of cancer than expected, but concluded there was no link to the work place...I must have missed something. I worked in the fabs in the past and we definitely had a number of people below 40 years of age contract and in some cases, die of cancer. I somehow fail to see the disassociation of the fab work environment and the high number of cancers in young people that work there. If you are not aware, many of the chemicals used in Semiconductor manufacturing are carcinogenic and/or toxic. There is a lot of safety equipment and monitoring, but I'm convinced from my experience that folks are still exposed to those chemicals in small amounts. The Semiconductor Industry Association was supposed to to a study on this, but I don't know that they ever did. I can almost guarantee that anecdotal evidence from former fab workers would indicate higher that expected cancer rates.

KB3001
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re: Report finds no increased cancer risk at Greenock fab
KB3001   8/25/2010 9:15:51 PM
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Yes, people working in the same place are also more likely to share a similar lifestyle. A new wider study which should not get too fixated on the workplace needs to be conducted.

_hm
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re: Report finds no increased cancer risk at Greenock fab
_hm   8/25/2010 5:06:16 AM
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I do feel sympathetic with the people suffering cancer from some potential cause at work. However, if I have to choose profession to work, there is always some risk involved that affects my long term health in many different aspects. Is not this risk of getting cancer or other similar deadly disease relative? When they publish some likely correlation like this, should they put some relative index of misery as compare to other risk encountered by other professionals? Take for various examples like healthcare – pathology, nursing, RF design/test - high power amplifier, military work or working in many other industrial environments like mines and other. How significant is this findings as compare to misery faced by many other professional in their daily duty? Should we take this as integral part of modern technology and society?

Sheetal.Pandey
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re: Report finds no increased cancer risk at Greenock fab
Sheetal.Pandey   8/25/2010 2:33:49 AM
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This is strange, according to this report many different kinds of cancers occur due to working in that facility. Can that really happen? I think more investigation need to be done to support this.

Luis Sanchez
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re: Report finds no increased cancer risk at Greenock fab
Luis Sanchez   8/24/2010 8:45:04 PM
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The studies should be considered concluded. The root cause can be anywhere, not only in the nature of the work they do in the factory but perhaps there is a relation with some other common thing among them, like the water they drink or where do they live. I do hope the source is soon identified for the health of others.

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