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RF-MEMS to boost NTT's cell phones

8/31/2010 03:02 AM EDT
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VincePG
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re: RF-MEMS to boost NTT's cell phones
VincePG   9/1/2010 1:57:19 AM
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This is so cool. Correct me if I'm wrong on this since I'm no expert, but the way I understand this to work is small(10 micron diameter, 1/10 the size of a hair) fingers of various resonating properties(lengths) are created on a layered silicon substrate. An electrical signal is passed through a finger that vibrates at a specific harmonic frequency and depending on the adjacent finger harmonic properties a signal is passed filtered. It's all mechanical. This technology can be interleaved so that the filter can be adaptable to CPU process, unlike a discrete filter. The fingers can be connected mechanically, like tiny springs, or they can be linked using electric fields and magnetic attractions. Since the cell environment is variable having a CPU adaptable filter is a real advantage for cell phones.

CJS2
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re: RF-MEMS to boost NTT's cell phones
CJS2   8/31/2010 11:24:12 AM
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I hope this proves to be a significant improvement in cell reception. I have had many instances of dropped calls where the apparent signal strength as displayed by my phone has jumped back from the lowest displayed signal strength in a matter of seconds while driving. Perhaps the next iteration of the IPhone will not require a "bumper".

Jimelectr
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re: RF-MEMS to boost NTT's cell phones
Jimelectr   8/31/2010 4:26:05 AM
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MEMS are definitely the way of the future. How far in the future is anyone's guess. I predict that there will be 3 steps in the progression: 1) MEMS devices will be on a board in separate packages from the radio chip(s), 2) MEMS will reside on a separate die from the radio chip in the same package, and 3) MEMS will become a part of the radio chip itself. You heard it here first!

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