Breaking News
News & Analysis

Intel taps junctionless transistor research

9/21/2010 05:18 PM EDT
8 comments
NO RATINGS
More Related Links
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Neo10
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel taps junctionless transistor research
Neo10   9/24/2010 4:48:53 AM
NO RATINGS
This news is more about how Intel supports Universities or more particularly Profs who indulge is offbeat often unexciting research. Junctionless transistors, my ankle! just renaming something to make it sound exiting will not make the research productive. A completely unwarranted article but at least the Irish govt is happy for the moment.

Passion_nano
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel taps junctionless transistor research
Passion_nano   9/23/2010 5:29:50 AM
NO RATINGS
The problem of this junctionless transistor could be an introduction of new source of dopant density fluctuation in ultra small FETs which would not present in an un-doped channel.

Kinnar
User Rank
CEO
re: Intel taps junctionless transistor research
Kinnar   9/22/2010 12:18:16 PM
NO RATINGS
seems great, junctions is the place due to which it requires using two different materials for chip manufacturing. one this technology is feasible for production will improve the number of transistors on chip. but looking fundamentally it would be very interesting to know how the amplification is being done in this transistor.

Dave.Dykstra
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel taps junctionless transistor research
Dave.Dykstra   9/22/2010 4:08:13 AM
NO RATINGS
Well, I'm thinking that anything that provides higher speed interconnects has a great deal of potential. What we don't see here anywhere are what the potential problems and issues are with this solutions. As pointed out, I suspect that "junction-less" is a bit of a misnomer, but I would like to see more detail on how this actually works (the wedding ring analogy is pretty interesting and I'm sure there will be a lot more humor from that).

JLS
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel taps junctionless transistor research
JLS   9/21/2010 11:50:42 PM
NO RATINGS
This "wedding ring" sounds a lot like a grid in a vacuum tube that has a negative charge to regulate the current between the cathode and anode. Interesting name, though; must not come from pleasant experiences.

pixies
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel taps junctionless transistor research
pixies   9/21/2010 9:25:34 PM
NO RATINGS
A junction exists whenever two materials meet at an interface. In this case the silicon is so thin it is fully depleted. Besides, how are you going to make contacts? A Schottky Junctions will definitely be involved making the contacts. So calling it a "junction-less" transistor is indeed a misnomer. As to the wedding ring analogy, unlike a transistor, a wedding ring never allows charge to flow, so that's a misnomer too. :)

Warren3
User Rank
CEO
re: Intel taps junctionless transistor research
Warren3   9/21/2010 8:29:56 PM
NO RATINGS
Well, I'm thinking it sounds awfully interesting. I'm also thinking that there have been some Intel purchases reported on this sight recently where there was plenty of peanut gallery comment on how Intel can't make a go of its corporate purchases so, for grins, I'd like to hear what the wisdom is on how well Intel does with it's university engagements. Oh, speaking of engagements, the funniest thing I've seen in a while is the following tidbit from Popular Science regarding junctionless transistors where the feature for limiting current is described as a wedding band... which, essentially, squeezes the life out of the silicon wire to keep charge from passing. Too funny [don't tell my wife though]. "A component nicknamed the "wedding ring" regulates the flow of current by electrically "squeezing" the wire to stop the electron flow, much in the way you might crimp a drinking straw to stop liquid from moving through it." //www.popsci.com/technology/article/2010-02/junction-less-transistor-could-lead-cheaper-more-efficient-chips

Most Recent Comments
Flash Poll
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
Join our online Radio Show on Friday 11th July starting at 2:00pm Eastern, when EETimes editor of all things fun and interesting, Max Maxfield, and embedded systems expert, Jack Ganssle, will debate as to just what is, and is not, and embedded system.
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Top Comments of the Week