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AMCC takes another shot at multicore

9/27/2010 07:15 PM EDT
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Warren3
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re: AMCC takes another shot at multicore
Warren3   9/28/2010 8:14:53 PM
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Thanks for the additional background info Mark. ------- Who do you suppose will make the quickest and deepest impact; AMCC with this rehash or Tilera with its 100 core offering.

mark.lapedus
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re: AMCC takes another shot at multicore
mark.lapedus   9/28/2010 12:58:30 AM
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AMCC is trying again at multicore. Last year, it rolled out a CMOS-based, 32-bit processor, built around IBM Corp.'s Power Architecture. What's different is that the codenamed Gemini multicore processor from AppliedMicro will not be manufactured in a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) process by its long-time foundry partner--IBM. Instead, Gemini will be made using a 90-nm, bulk CMOS process from Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. Ltd. (TSMC), as part of a new and expanded foundry arrangement between the two companies. Gemini never flew, however. Here's what AMCC said: ''So after announcing Gemini at 90nm last year, the company decided to wait until the 40nm in order to provide true differentiation in the market, and that’s what you see announced today with PacketPro. The decision was made some time after the Gemini announcement in Sept. 2009. Gemini is a working processor and it was demonstrated at ESC Silicon Valley this year. It’s been used mostly as an evaluation platform with customers. The innovative capabilities demonstrated with Gemini at 90nm led directly to strong customer feedback and the development of PacketPro at 40nm, which is being demonstrated today at the Linley Processor Conference in San Jose.''

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