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CMOS oscillator said to beat quartz

10/22/2010 06:11 PM EDT
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daleste
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re: CMOS oscillator said to beat quartz
daleste   10/22/2010 6:29:52 PM
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Very nice solution. I guess with the noise problems, it will never be integrated onto the ASIC. Can it be used in a separate package in the system or does it have to be packaged with the ASIC to avoid stray capacitance and ground loop issues?

R_Colin_Johnson
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re: CMOS oscillator said to beat quartz
R_Colin_Johnson   10/22/2010 8:30:09 PM
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Yes, it can be packaged on its own too. In fact, I believe you can set up its pinout to match that of the quartz oscillator it is replacing.

RebounD11
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re: CMOS oscillator said to beat quartz
RebounD11   10/22/2010 9:06:40 PM
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noise problem? The phase noise seems a little lower than in other types of CMOS oscillators and should be much lower at the frequencies at which it is user configurable. I'm also pretty sure it will have an option of being separately packaged, since wire bonding is also used for linking silicon to the package. That's my 2 cents anyway.

old account Frank Eory
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re: CMOS oscillator said to beat quartz
old account Frank Eory   10/22/2010 9:31:45 PM
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Lots of people have integrated high frequency LC oscillators on CMOS SoCs, so in reality the noise problems are not such an insurmountable barrier to integration. But IDT is not in the SoC business and is not offering this as an IP block for others to integrate -- hence, the discussion in the article about IDT selling bare die so you can do stacked die in one package. Either way, you achieve ths same result -- eliminating the quartz crystal -- which is the whole point. IDT has taken this nicely compensated LC oscillator plus dividers and built it as a stand-alone chip that targets quartz oscillator replacement for clock frequencies up to 133 MHz -- a clever marketing approach that could be very successful for them. I do think, however, that the article title is somewhat misleading. "beat quartz" are not the words I would use to describe an oscillator that is "almost as accurate as quartz."

R_Colin_Johnson
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re: CMOS oscillator said to beat quartz
R_Colin_Johnson   10/22/2010 10:03:12 PM
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Here CMOS offers comparable performance, but "beats" quartz in size and price. Unfortunately a headline is too short to explain what it means--that's what the story is for :)

sharps_eng
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re: CMOS oscillator said to beat quartz
sharps_eng   10/23/2010 7:56:01 AM
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I like the 100us start-up time. Crystals can be 500 times slower - not every newbie remembers that in their uP reset circuit design.

Timing Guy
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re: CMOS oscillator said to beat quartz
Timing Guy   10/23/2010 4:09:31 PM
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I'm concerned about the costs. They get to 100ppm by testing and throwing away the parts that are out of spec. Gets way too expensive. Quartz will be king forever!!!

old account Frank Eory
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re: CMOS oscillator said to beat quartz
old account Frank Eory   10/23/2010 4:16:37 PM
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Forever is a long time Timing Guy. Not too many years ago it was a given that a good radio receiver required a SAW filter. But since the SAW couldn't be integrated in silicon, clever engineers found a way to design it out in many applications. Never say never...

krisi
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re: CMOS oscillator said to beat quartz
krisi   10/23/2010 5:30:39 PM
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Interesting development, for those who would like to hear IDT presentation they will presenting at CMOS Emerging Technologies workshop in Whistler in 2011, details at www.cmoset.com Kris

Silicon Guy
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re: CMOS oscillator said to beat quartz
Silicon Guy   10/23/2010 8:54:55 PM
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This is a rather odd comment from Timing Guy. First, I've seen one of IDT's talks and they use a massively parallel test to trim every single device so yield should be in the high nineties in terms of percentage. They certainly don't "throw" anything away other than typical semiconductor yield loss due to defect density which should be very small with such a small die. Second, and assuming I am understanding correctly, by offering the die product, they are selling directly against passive resonators. That ASP is probably around $0.10 or less. Interestingly, that suggests that the CMOS oscillator is much lower cost than commoditized quartz. It seems like a real threat to quartz to finally make the function in standard silicon.

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