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Qualcomm rolls 28-nm Snapdragon

11/18/2010 01:16 AM EST
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selinz
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re: Qualcomm rolls 28-nm Snapdragon
selinz   12/1/2010 7:03:19 PM
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Mobile phones are one area that will see a major improvement with multiple cores. Had these been available with the "old" Windows Mobile, it could have had the best user experience of anything on the market. (IMHO). I haven't used an iphone 4 but my iPod touch is nice, handy, response and limited. The user inerface is great for information coming out at you, not good for you sending information to it.

eewiz
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re: Qualcomm rolls 28-nm Snapdragon
eewiz   11/23/2010 7:48:43 PM
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Good to see Dual Core Snapdragon finally touching the market. Thought Qcom is pretty late to market since Nvidia Tegra 2 was available from long back. But they cleverly leapfrogged to 28nm process compared to Tegra 2 which is at 45nm. Cant wait to see the benchmarks :)

Tom VanCourt
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re: Qualcomm rolls 28-nm Snapdragon
Tom VanCourt   11/23/2010 2:22:23 PM
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"Performance" means what? Instructions per second? MIPS per watt? Anyone who's seen three benchmarks can come up with five meanings for the word, some of them contradictory.

rburnettcpa
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re: Qualcomm rolls 28-nm Snapdragon
rburnettcpa   11/22/2010 6:01:13 PM
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What a great company

JohnB101
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re: Qualcomm rolls 28-nm Snapdragon
JohnB101   11/20/2010 4:57:48 AM
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Five times is feasible if you are comparing this dual-core processor against a single core (QSD8250), some IPC improvement due to OoE and some clock speed boost. You can read more about this processor here as well: http://bit.ly/aFSS1D

yalanand
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re: Qualcomm rolls 28-nm Snapdragon
yalanand   11/19/2010 1:03:13 PM
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Hey its five times and not five percent.

Paul A. Clayton
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re: Qualcomm rolls 28-nm Snapdragon
Paul A. Clayton   11/18/2010 6:23:38 PM
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My guess is that it is 5x the performance at 75% less power for a constant workload (in other words, per instruction). This is not just market-ese, though it could have been worded more clearly. In many cases, consistent workload is a good model for battery life--barring the performance boost enabling a new highly used feature--, while the 5x performance allows improved responsiveness (a 500ms response time might be usable--i.e., the feature is enabled and will consume its portion of power--where 100ms may become more pleasant [even the constant feature with improved response time can drain more power by reducing human thought-time and, of course, increasing the frequency of use]) as well as enabling new features.

elctrnx_lyf
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re: Qualcomm rolls 28-nm Snapdragon
elctrnx_lyf   11/18/2010 4:32:59 PM
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Five percent performance sound like a really a lot of perfromance. How thay are able to get so much with so less power. Is it because of ARM processor inside the chip. But the processor sounds cool with its all integarted wireless capabilities such as WLAN, GPS, Bluettoh. Thats more like a system on chip solution for any mobile phone.

pica0
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re: Qualcomm rolls 28-nm Snapdragon
pica0   11/18/2010 8:10:52 AM
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Yes, I know: Lies, damn lies, benchmarks, marketing.

metafor
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re: Qualcomm rolls 28-nm Snapdragon
metafor   11/18/2010 7:56:32 AM
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One has to be careful with marketing numbers. It likely means either 5x the performance compared to the current design *or* 75% less power; not both.

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