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Cloud gaming patent arrives--after 8 years

12/14/2010 02:22 PM EST
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Sheetal.Pandey
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re: Cloud gaming patent arrives--after 8 years
Sheetal.Pandey   12/15/2010 3:30:42 AM
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8 years to issue a patent and 750,000 application backlog, its high time patent office hire more employees and finish the work. Information looses its charm if not given at the right time. And patent industry makes huge money these days so whats the problem?

jaybus0
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CEO
re: Cloud gaming patent arrives--after 8 years
jaybus0   12/15/2010 2:04:13 PM
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The bottom line is that the value of a patent is decreasing along with its usefulness. Most patents are really re-engineering to get around someone else's patent. The attempt to "re-engineer-proof" a patent is thus probably the reason for the marked increase in the number of claims. The net effect is that the PTO gets bogged down. This does give large players an advantage, since when there are hundreds of patents for essentially the same idea with a slight twist, any one of those patents is only meaningful if it has been tested in court. As was pointed out elsewhere, a really new or novel patent gets through quicker. If your patent takes 8 years to issue, then it is far less likely that it could stand up in court anyway.

bill1230
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re: Cloud gaming patent arrives--after 8 years
bill1230   12/15/2010 4:59:11 PM
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Privatize the USPTO to introduce some free market efficiencies. Everything a government agency can do, private industry can do better, faster, and cheaper.

chanj0
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re: Cloud gaming patent arrives--after 8 years
chanj0   12/15/2010 9:36:40 PM
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What's the cause of the backlog? Is it the efficiency or is it because of the # of attempted patents? For patent process, I would rather the office do a thorough study before granting it. There are just a bit too many patents that are not fallen into the category but that are attempted.

sharps_eng
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re: Cloud gaming patent arrives--after 8 years
sharps_eng   12/15/2010 11:06:02 PM
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I found that a patent has most value in decreasing perceived risk for prospective investors, but needs to be supported by other risk-reduction factors like successful trial data, reference market feedback, and believeable ROI costings. However, all that supporting evidence is not of much interest to investors without obvious IP protection activity to provide the comfort factor, even if the patent itself is destined to be vapour.

przem
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re: Cloud gaming patent arrives--after 8 years
przem   12/16/2010 3:35:08 AM
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Privatizing works best when there is an established market in which it's clear who is the customer, what they want, and what are the costs. Issuing patents isn't one of those. Who is the customer of the patent system? The Constitution establishes the patent system specifically "To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts". How would you set up incentives to guarantee that the privatized patent system would fulfill this goal. I have no doubt that privatized patent office would be very efficient in issuing a prodigious number of patents and clearing the backlog, but how would you guarantee their quality or positive effect on the industry and science? It's true that the PTO should wake up and adopt some industry best practices, like providing readable patent documents rather than individual TIFF pages---but I don't see how they could delegate the policy without compromising the constitutional mandate for promoting progress.

Kinnar
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re: Cloud gaming patent arrives--after 8 years
Kinnar   12/16/2010 7:46:45 AM
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This is something frustrating why people are after patents, let all use their expertises and come up with something new. It requires too many things for one venture to get succeed. The nature is doing all this things but the "nature" have never asked for patent.

nineman
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re: Cloud gaming patent arrives--after 8 years
nineman   12/16/2010 11:06:32 AM
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Kinnar - Patents were invented to encourage & reward humans to do all the things that nature doesn't do by herself. If our ancestors had left it to nature, your photo wouldn't show us your nice shirt; you wouldn't have spectacles or a clean shave (or a photo). Of the people and companies who developed those things for you over the last 500 or so years, 99.9% did so with the protection of patents, and now you get the benefit. You are right it requires many things for a venture to succeed, but this is why patent protection in the early stages is so important: the inventor/employer needs some comfort to balance the risk that all those things won't come together. Somebody needs to buy the computers and pay the engineers, or the great ideas will simply go to waste. Great discussion anyway. It is unusual to see such a sane discussion on patents on the web!

nineman
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re: Cloud gaming patent arrives--after 8 years
nineman   12/16/2010 11:37:35 AM
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przen you can download patent publications in PDF format from USPTO and many other providers, free of charge. The only inconvenience is that you usually will need to enter one of those scrambled codes. Hope that makes your life easier!

Axel_5
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re: Cloud gaming patent arrives--after 8 years
Axel_5   12/16/2010 1:04:50 PM
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The main problem is that such simple stuff can be patented at all. They are just describing a simple method to use a centralised server instead of a gaming box at home. Actually the only reason it has not been done before is that neither the servers nor the communication lines were powerful enough to do this eight years ago. Given the technology of today this is a nobrainer. However as everybody else can patent their stuff at a similar level it is mandatory to get a patent for whatever people do just to make sure they're not blocked from their own idea.

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