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Nanowires process arithmetic/logic

2/11/2011 06:38 PM EST
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Luis Sanchez
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re: Nanowires process arithmetic/logic
Luis Sanchez   2/11/2011 10:14:34 PM
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It's always interesting to read news about the emerging nanotechnology. I wonder who's more advanced? the universities and non-profit research centers or the private sector? I wonder how's the technology passed from the schools to the private companies? Who will be the first to capitalize on this innovation? By the way, I didn't see what kind of metal are the wires made of.

_hm
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re: Nanowires process arithmetic/logic
_hm   2/12/2011 12:00:20 AM
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What about reliability aspect? What will be operating temperature and other environmetal specifications? How about EMI/EMC and EMP? Will they have typical life of 15 years or more?

pixies
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re: Nanowires process arithmetic/logic
pixies   2/14/2011 2:39:59 PM
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It is a really interesting work. The article, however, did not explain how the nanowires were made. Were they synthesized first and then attached to the wafer or were they deposited as a film and then lithographically defined on the wafer? If latter, then this is simply the extension of the existing semiconductor manufacturing technology.

R_Colin_Johnson
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re: Nanowires process arithmetic/logic
R_Colin_Johnson   2/15/2011 1:03:32 AM
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The nanowire material was silicon germanium.

R_Colin_Johnson
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re: Nanowires process arithmetic/logic
R_Colin_Johnson   2/15/2011 1:06:48 AM
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These devices are so small, that I believe reliability will be an ongoing issue affecting not only the material formulation, but the architecture used--redundancy?

R_Colin_Johnson
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re: Nanowires process arithmetic/logic
R_Colin_Johnson   2/15/2011 1:11:22 AM
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Lieber's Harvard lab is dedicated to bottom-up synthesis, that is self-assembling processes that achieve array densities beyond the reach of traditional lithography.

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