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Samsung CEO: Headwinds hinder PRAM

2/21/2011 11:10 PM EST
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bingdao
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re: Samsung CEO: Headwinds hinder PRAM
bingdao   11/30/2011 2:11:00 AM
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So Mr volative Memory, could you please give me a link that I could find Mr.Neale's recent articles. I am also very intreseted with the negative side of PCM. Thank you very much~

Araucaria
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re: Samsung CEO: Headwinds hinder PRAM
Araucaria   2/23/2011 11:49:16 AM
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The problem with PCM is that it isn't a drop in replacement for other memory types and it needs the system people to optimise for it. See for example: http://www.cs.rochester.edu/~ipek/cacm10.pdf It seems systems designers are not yet ready to do so.

Volatile Memory
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re: Samsung CEO: Headwinds hinder PRAM
Volatile Memory   2/22/2011 9:47:22 PM
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selinz: The rumor last Fall was that Samsung yanked out the PRAM MCP out of their own cell phones due to power-consumption issues.

Volatile Memory
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re: Samsung CEO: Headwinds hinder PRAM
Volatile Memory   2/22/2011 9:45:05 PM
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EFosters: Actually, the jury is in and the case is closed. You apparently have not read Mr. Neale's recent articles on PCM/PRAM published by EE Times. You should.

selinz
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re: Samsung CEO: Headwinds hinder PRAM
selinz   2/22/2011 7:40:25 PM
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It's amusing that Samsung is vertically integrated so this reluctance is obviously in house... There must be more to the story.

EFosters
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re: Samsung CEO: Headwinds hinder PRAM
EFosters   2/22/2011 7:15:46 PM
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Good points everyone. In the end, potential dispruptive technologies like PCM/PRAM need to show substantial improvement that matters over today's technology. The jury is still out and that's why there's not much prodution today. Can PCM or any of the other contending "universal memories" be commercially viable for cost-efficient, volume production? Will they exceed the benefits of today’s technology by a degree large enough to justify customer and industry investment in rearchitecting? I think we are a long way away.

resistion
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re: Samsung CEO: Headwinds hinder PRAM
resistion   2/22/2011 12:41:52 PM
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It's hard to beat standard robust metals and oxides for memory materials, instead of dealing with peculiar characteristics like glass flow and ferro.

Volatile Memory
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re: Samsung CEO: Headwinds hinder PRAM
Volatile Memory   2/22/2011 5:49:40 AM
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Actually, Numonyx 1Gbit 45nm device was supposed to ship in 2009. Then in early 2010. Then in late 2010. Now, never. Samsung's PRAM was found in just one fake, planted, non-commercial handset (I mean one unit!) - since destroyed. Yes, the initial specs for Samsung GT-E2550 called for PRAM, but it turned out PRAM simply uses to much power and drains the battery, so the PRAM was quickly replaced back with NOR. No Samsung phone currently in production uses any PRAM. No other phones or any other commercial products use any PCM/PRAM either. PCM/PRAM sucks. It is horribly overpriced, too slow and power-hungry in write, unreliable, with poor density, and it does not scale. It is the longest-running Techno-Ponzi scheme, but it is now coming to an end. Finally.

krisi
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re: Samsung CEO: Headwinds hinder PRAM
krisi   2/22/2011 12:44:59 AM
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I am finding the statement that systems guys are slow in adopting PRAM for unknown reasons a little suspicious. I think if the advantage of PRAM was obvious everyone and his grandmother would be implementing those memories...Kris

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