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The case against Thunderbolt

2/28/2011 04:00 PM EST
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LarryM99
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re: The case against Thunderbolt
LarryM99   2/28/2011 4:22:08 PM
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I really don't see Thunderbolt as a replacement for USB. If anything, USB3.0 is ahead of the curve a bit in its established peripheral market. What I do see are new uses for it to which USB does not apply. For example, you could use it for a subsystem interconnect to move expansion cards outside of the PC chassis. Need a couple more PCIe slots? Add an external chassis via a Thunderbolt link. Larry M.

GREAT-Terry
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re: The case against Thunderbolt
GREAT-Terry   2/28/2011 4:59:11 PM
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Higher speed may finally turn out new applications, especially from some companies like Apple. Without knowing the price tag however really puts some uncertainty on how well the market can accept this new technology. But Intel+Apple seems is a good reason why people can keep watching at.

evangellydonut
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re: The case against Thunderbolt
evangellydonut   2/28/2011 5:17:10 PM
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The new SSD external HDs using SandForce 2 controllers are pushing 400MB+/sec speed that USB 3.0 is unable to support (400MB is theoretical after protocol overhead). Will USB 4.0 come out in 2012-13 to support the next generation SSD drives? I'm buying a new Macbook Pro because of the fact it supports Thunderbolt so I can use it with the new SSDs and not have an interface bottleneck.

elctrnx_lyf
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re: The case against Thunderbolt
elctrnx_lyf   2/28/2011 5:22:41 PM
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This situation looks like the big leaders are pushing technology even if it is required or not. But the consumers will decide the future of it.

halarpd
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re: The case against Thunderbolt
halarpd   2/28/2011 6:39:35 PM
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The controller chip is required on both side, in transmitter - a notebook and in receiver - a peripheral. Also, as written here, TB is expanding PCIe to an external box so if you want to put any device on this extend PCIe bus one would need PCIe to xyz converter silicon - for example PCIe to Sata for sata drive. With today's semiconductor technology all these (TB controller plus xyz peripherals) could be integrated in a low cost solution but it does not exist today. So I would say there were will be players like Apple who will use this technology but any mass adaptation is two to three years away. Oh by the way the DP is only 1.1 not 1.2!!

Sanjib.A
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re: The case against Thunderbolt
Sanjib.A   2/28/2011 6:40:29 PM
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Not only USB 3.0...after Intel comes out with an optical cable for Thunderbolt in 2011, what is going to happen to "Lightpeak"? Has Intel dropped the idea of "Lightpeak"?

old account Frank Eory
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re: The case against Thunderbolt
old account Frank Eory   2/28/2011 7:26:07 PM
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Thunderbolt is the new name for Light Peak.

Code Monkey
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re: The case against Thunderbolt
Code Monkey   2/28/2011 9:18:01 PM
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10GBPS serdes probably fits better into their process roadmap, where 5GBPS (USB) either leaves too much performance on the table or fizzles out too soon. Apple invented USB, so they surely looked long and hard at the tradeoffs between USB and Thunderbolt.

fdunn0
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re: The case against Thunderbolt
fdunn0   2/28/2011 10:22:03 PM
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Then don't buy an external HD without either FibreChannel or 10Gb ethernet fabric. You starting to feel the pain yet? "Thunderbolt" (really lame name) is nothing more than 10Gb ethernet with a differing protocol. With that said, 10Gb transceivers (optical in particular) are not yet commodity priced interfaces so it will start off slow and more than likely be replaced at the point of "final take off" by 100Gb ethernet.

fdunn0
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re: The case against Thunderbolt
fdunn0   2/28/2011 10:27:38 PM
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There will be room for both but as you said the consumers will have the final say. The motherboards I see and buy have many times more USB ports than FireWire due to the formers high take-up rate and low cost. On the flip-side (as a hardware guy) FireWire does not use as much CPU time as USB. IMHO - Thunderbolt (LightPeak is better) will be limited to the Mac domain and there will be some PCIe Add-On cards for PCs.

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