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Momentum builds for directed self-assembly

3/2/2011 09:24 PM EST
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lgadwah
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re: Momentum builds for directed self-assembly
lgadwah   3/4/2011 7:39:37 PM
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http://domino.research.ibm.com/comm/research_projects.nsf/pages/selfassembly.nxtalFLASH.html

krisi
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re: Momentum builds for directed self-assembly
krisi   3/4/2011 4:23:39 PM
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Can direct sub-assembly find application in other areas of manufacturing beyond lithography? Kris

selinz
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re: Momentum builds for directed self-assembly
selinz   3/4/2011 4:31:05 AM
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This sounds similar to the Langmuir blodgett films that IBM was working on in 1983... Cool stuff but it's been around quite a while.. Nice application though.

mcgrathdylan
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re: Momentum builds for directed self-assembly
mcgrathdylan   3/3/2011 6:01:16 PM
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@les_slater- paragraph 6 of the above article is my best attempt at explaining what I understand DSA to be in the simplest possible terms. I realize it probably falls short. I solicited this quote from Christopher Bencher of Applied Materials to describe what DSA is. I hope it helps: "Self assembly is a method of patterning using polymer phase-separation to generate features, typically less than 20nm, instead of relying solely on the classic mask projection into photo-resist. It has now established the first 300mm wafer defect density data point for directed self-assembly, and when plotted on historical defect density reduction roadmaps appears to be quite promising; the initial value is comparable to the immersion defect densities in its early years of commercialization. This result merits continued research and development for establishing directed self-assembly as a viable patterning technique for semiconductor manufacturing." -- Christopher Bencher, Applied Materials

double-o-nothing
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re: Momentum builds for directed self-assembly
double-o-nothing   3/3/2011 3:08:40 PM
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The number of self-assembled lines is too sensitive to the boundary size. A line could disappear if the boundary is a tad narrow.

Les_Slater
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re: Momentum builds for directed self-assembly
Les_Slater   3/3/2011 1:17:39 AM
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K. Eric Wexler is of course, K. Eric Drexler.

Les_Slater
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re: Momentum builds for directed self-assembly
Les_Slater   3/3/2011 1:05:17 AM
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The article talks about the potential of this technology and at what development stage it may be at but doesn’t explain what it is. It was the title of the article that brought me to read it. The implications are quite attractive. My first introduction to such concepts was at an MIT talk I attended in the late 80’s by K. Eric Wexler. What this present article is referring to does not seem to be related to his ‘universal assemblers’ though. That was a relief because the mechanism he suggested, engineering proteins for specific mechanical assembly tasks seems quite remote still. So, on this new ‘directed self-assembly’, the question arises, what is the mechanism of the direction? Looking around the web a bit I see there is talk of lithographic patterning and random deposition where capillary, electrostatic and van der Waals forces focus or sharpen the random deposition to conform to the lithographic pattern. Is this what we’re talking about here? Sounds exciting.

Les_Slater
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re: Momentum builds for directed self-assembly
Les_Slater   3/3/2011 1:03:13 AM
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The article talks about the potential of this technology and at what development stage it may be at but doesn’t explain what it is. It was the title of the article that brought me to read it. The implications are quite attractive. My first introduction to such concepts was at an MIT talk I attended in the late 80’s by K. Eric Wexler. What this present article is referring to does not seem to be related to his ‘universal assemblers’ though. That was a relief because the mechanism he suggested, engineering proteins for specific mechanical assembly tasks seems quite remote still. So, on this new ‘directed self-assembly’, the question arises, what is the mechanism of the direction? Looking around the web a bit I see there is talk of lithographic patterning and random deposition where capillary, electrostatic and van der Waals forces focus or sharpen the random deposition to conform to the lithographic pattern. Is this what we’re talking about here? Sounds exciting.

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