Design Con 2015
Breaking News
News & Analysis

Congress hears two views on H-1B visas

3/31/2011 07:16 PM EDT
22 comments
NO RATINGS
More Related Links
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
Dr Gene Nelson
User Rank
Rookie
re: Congress hears two views on H-1B visas
Dr Gene Nelson   2/25/2012 10:34:00 PM
NO RATINGS
Hello, JAK620: It is basic supply and demand economics. If the supply of skilled workers is increased via H-1B Visas, the market clearing wage decreases. Many tech employers now reserve openings for H-1Bs and other work visa holders. How do I know? Because it has been documented that the job openings are only posted in India! Look at the problems that Semiconductor Engineer Darin Wedel has experienced in trying to find employment since he was displaced by a H-1B at Texas Instruments in 2009. To understand the corrupt roots of these work visa programs, please read the PDF version of my 2007 investigative article, "The Greedy Gates Immigration Gambit." A relevant 08 February 2012 article veteran journalist Don Bauder is "Fed H-1B Visa Probes May Help American Engineer."

Robinho
User Rank
Rookie
re: Congress hears two views on H-1B visas
Robinho   4/8/2011 3:59:44 PM
NO RATINGS
Are these MBA types also on H1b? Are there lesser H1s in MBA than engineering? Is pursuing MS more expensive than pursuing MBA? Are kids in USA more likely to take up business than engineering?

peralta_mike
User Rank
Rookie
re: Congress hears two views on H-1B visas
peralta_mike   4/8/2011 2:21:27 PM
NO RATINGS
The only companies that should qualify for H-1B visas are those companies that do NOT lay off engineers. Why would you need H-1B visas when you are also laying off good engineers every year. The companies who complain are just plain lying. They want the lower wage and unpaid overtime from their H-1B employees. And I have personally seen how companies treat the H-1B employees. Those employees are always under the threat of being cut out if they don't work 16 hours/day, 7 days/week.

JAK620
User Rank
Rookie
re: Congress hears two views on H-1B visas
JAK620   4/7/2011 12:36:52 AM
NO RATINGS
To Dr Gene Nelson: I understand your perspectives. I just would like to tell you that I am no scientist. I got a job not because that I steal, that I am cheap labor, or that I am a foreigner but because I studied hard, I work hard, I had many years of work experience, and I am lucky. I own a house. I love my car. I enjoy having a pro-sports season ticket. I pay tax more than those who make less than me but less than those who make more than I do. I pay my bills on time. I go to Wal-Mart and Target to shop and I go to BK to buy Mini Blueberry Biscuits + meal no.1 for breakfast. And I love Mac Frappes. I am not pro-H1B. But for my case and everyone I know from work with H-1B, H-1B is not for jobs taking orders from the drive through lane or landscaping. It is not a Ponzi Scheme as you pictured. It is an opportunity for me to apply for a job that is open to you too. If a Corporation hires me just because they think they can pay me lower salary, that Corporation will not survive the global competition. Microsoft is one of those out-spoken Corp. which supports H-1B. Microsoft is big not because of H-1B. But it asks for H-1B not because it is cheap either.

JAK620
User Rank
Rookie
re: Congress hears two views on H-1B visas
JAK620   4/7/2011 12:35:33 AM
NO RATINGS
I did not have a brilliant transcript from my undergrad years. So it was tough for me to get any financial-supporting degree offer from the U.S. institutes. But I had worked in the Industry outside of the U.S. for many years prior to applying for my graduate degree in the US. With my personal savings plus working at the school food court and taking various legal job offerings at school earning $7.25/hour, I was able to fund myself for the 2 years of graduate study in the US. I could only work on part-time in-campus jobs according to USCIS's regulations. Part-time means that we could work up to 20 hours a week. Not every in-campus jobs are open to foreign students. So it limited foreign students' opportunities to either compete harder academically for the few scholarship slots each year or food court jobs with $7.25/hour. When I graduated, I felt like a fresh college graduate again… financially, since I had depleted my savings from so many years. I was planning on returning to my old job. But the environment at school in the semester was that all students tried to look for job opportunities. I started to work on my resume and applied for jobs because... I felt like that if others can do it, I can do it, too. The American-citizen classmate of mine got the best job offer (no kidding) at the time. Many foreign students that I knew went home. And I felt lucky to be able to continue my career in the semiconductor industry.

JAK620
User Rank
Rookie
re: Congress hears two views on H-1B visas
JAK620   4/7/2011 12:35:11 AM
NO RATINGS
Streetrodder: I agree with you that finance could be a big factor, and that the tuition in the U.S. is relatively higher compared to an average family's household income. But with the assumption that having fewer American-citizen students in the STEM graduate school, it would lead to the conclusion that foreign graduate school students are wealthier, which is not true. For my case, I was lucky that my parents were able to and were willing to fund my undergraduate studies in my country. The expense was a financial hardship to the family but it did not increase the family debt. It certainly is not nearly as big a burden as it is for a typical family in the U.S. to support kid(s) in the college.

Dr Gene Nelson
User Rank
Rookie
re: Congress hears two views on H-1B visas
Dr Gene Nelson   4/6/2011 9:32:51 PM
NO RATINGS
Streetrodder: Part 2: In my view, the government leaders who implemented these policies and who still maintain them are traitors with regards to American economic and military security. I live three MetroRail stops from the opulent NSF HQs in Arlington, Virginia. I think about how much American citizen blood was sacrificed to build the NSF HQs any time I pass by the building. I have discussed the corrupt political processes that facilitated these policies with some NSF staffers and offered to debate the issue at NSF HQs, but so far, no one has taken me up on the offer. I also raised these issues in 1996 when I gave testimony at the National Academy of Sciences Washington, DC HQs. http://www.engology.com/ArtNelson.htm The economic and political elites that benefit from this scheme (which has many aspects in common with a Ponzi Scheme) do not desire any long-overdue critical examination of these issues.

Dr Gene Nelson
User Rank
Rookie
re: Congress hears two views on H-1B visas
Dr Gene Nelson   4/6/2011 9:29:52 PM
NO RATINGS
Streetrodder: Part 2: In my view, the government leaders who implemented these policies and who still maintain them are traitors with regards to American economic and military security. I live three MetroRail stops from the opulent NSF HQs in Arlington, Virginia. I think about how much American citizen blood was sacrificed to build the NSF HQs any time I pass by the building. I have discussed the corrupt political processes that facilitated these policies with some NSF staffers and offered to debate the issue at NSF HQs, but so far, no one has taken me up on the offer. I also raised these issues in 1996 when I gave testimony at the National Academy of Sciences Washington, DC HQs. http://www.engology.com/ArtNelson.htm The economic and political elites that benefit from this scheme (which has many aspects in common with a Ponzi Scheme) do not desire any long-overdue critical examination of these issues.

Dr Gene Nelson
User Rank
Rookie
re: Congress hears two views on H-1B visas
Dr Gene Nelson   4/6/2011 9:29:02 PM
NO RATINGS
Streetrodder: Part 1: As unbelievable as it sounds, the objective of discouraging U.S. science and engineering students from pursuing a graduate education was PLANNED by a government agency, the National Science Foundation (NSF) in the late 1980s under former IBM director Erich Bloch. The research was completed by Eric Weinstein, Ph.D. (MIT) http://www.nber.org/~peat/PapersFolder/Papers/SG/NSF.html Note the following under the section, "The NSF's Real Shortage Study" .....This pessimistic scenario of rising PhD scarcities and rapidly rising salaries serves to highlight some of the key issues that will be faced in the U.S. over the next several decades. First, the cost of decreasing U.S. reliance on NS&E PhD's earned by foreign citizens appears to be high. Not only will the salary costs of PhD-level researchers and teachers rise substantially, but also the scarce talent lured into the PhD-level NS&E career paths will not be available for other uses." This indicates that despite external calls for more talented Americans to enter scientific careers, internally members of NSF were actually worried about the wisdom of 'luring' talented U.S. students into the scientific labor market...... The NSF wanted more foreign scientists & engineers imported so that Ph.D.- level salaries would be kept artificially low. Increased supply depresses wage demands. The foreign national would accept below-market wages in exchange for eventual U.S. citizenship, a non-fungible benefit for people who are already U.S. citizens.

Streetrodder
User Rank
Rookie
re: Congress hears two views on H-1B visas
Streetrodder   4/6/2011 8:36:48 PM
NO RATINGS
JAK620, I would ask for an idea as to why there were so few americans in the class... For clarification - how did you pay for your undergraduate classes, graduate classes and cover living expenses? In my experience most of the non-US students I went to school with didn't need to worry about how to pay for education and living expenses. For US students, that's now a dominating concern. If you come out of an undergraduate program $50,000 in debt, what are the chances of going to graduate school? I had limited debt, but that's because I also worked 25 hours /week to cover living expenses. Far too many times I had to choose between working to keep the lights on or putting in a couple of extra hours studying. Lazlo's hierarchy of needs kicked in. Anyone who thinks money doesn't influence the number of US participants in advanced degrees lives in a fantasy world.

Page 1 / 3   >   >>
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
EE Times Senior Technical Editor Martin Rowe will interview EMC engineer Kenneth Wyatt.
Navigate to Related Links
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Flash Poll