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Rare earths get rarer

8/8/2011 03:58 PM EDT
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Charles.Desassure
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re: Rare earths get rarer
Charles.Desassure   8/10/2011 2:48:46 PM
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There's nothing rare here...You are l00% correct here..."It's all about short term profits."

RWatkins
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re: Rare earths get rarer
RWatkins   8/10/2011 2:41:13 PM
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This all seems like much ado about nothing. Agreed that China is now on an upward path and using any tools it can get to dominate world trade. This does sound a little familiar. However, as was briefly mentioned in the comments, there are risks in so doing that generally shift the playing field. In the case of phosphors, there are nitrides and silicates, which might have been left undeveloped had greed not intervened. In the case of rare earth magnets, the impetus has been re-established for use of switch reluctance motors (to replace BLDC in many applications), III-V semiconductor direct oscillators and amplifiers (to replace magnetrons and similar amplifier/oscillator schemes), and others. Necessity is the mother of invention, and a need is often established by shortages. So lets spend productive time schemeing and implementing inventive solutions, and avoid wasted time whining when the easy solution is "restricted".

Bert22306
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re: Rare earths get rarer
Bert22306   8/10/2011 12:17:20 AM
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It's all about short term profits. We all know that businesses themselves don't worry too much about what lies 20 years down the road. One way to look at this is that in the West, people are able to afford all manner of low-cost products, essentially on the backs of the underpaid labor in China and elsewhere. That's how we all can afford gorgeous huge, HDTVs, for instance. Another way to look at it is that this constitutes "foreign aid." A third way to look at it is that this fosters instability in countries where labor is too cheap, which in turn will lead to reform (or revolt) and eventual leveling of the playing field for everyone. E.g., labor in Japan can no longer be considered cheap.

qerqwe
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re: Rare earths get rarer
qerqwe   8/10/2011 12:03:03 AM
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AGREE

qerqwe
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re: Rare earths get rarer
qerqwe   8/10/2011 12:01:37 AM
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Right! And we are going to do this HOW?

mna41
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re: Rare earths get rarer
mna41   8/9/2011 10:06:39 PM
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The US prattles about "free markets" and allows other nations to compete on equal terms in our domestic markets. Meanwhile nations like China practice mercantilist economics. To a large extent it's "heads they win, tails we lose" economically.

mna41
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re: Rare earths get rarer
mna41   8/9/2011 10:00:23 PM
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Hey, folks! Phosphors for LEDs and fluorescent lighting doesn't account for all of rare earth demand. There are a variety of technology-intensive uses for rare earths. Rare earth magnets, for example, are important in automobiles, microwave technologies, and elsewhere.

chipmonk0
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re: Rare earths get rarer
chipmonk0   8/9/2011 5:25:00 PM
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There can be no technical spolution to Chinese manipulation / restriction of REM supply. Any new technology developed within the US aor the West will be promptly siphoned off to China by our own Corp.s who are in the bed w/ China. Over the last 3 decades we have created a Frankensteins' MONSTER and that is CHINA. The rewards of Outsourcing to China has been totally asymmetric. The common consumer in the West has gotten at most a 10 % savings at Wal Mart but this has come at the expense of 10 % unemployment and collateral costs to the general public Govt.s at least 3x of Trade Deficit w/ China and its growing power and resource consumption. Only Wall St. and large investors have benefited from China's growth at the expense of the economies of the US, Japan and the developed countries of Europe. They have 1. outsourced most manufacturing to China, invested in China, 2. transferred to China manufacturing and other technologies developed within the US at Govt. and taxpayer expense, 3. had the best US universities open their doors to Chinese Grad students who have infiltrated US industries and those who return home take back a few hard disks worth of US know how and diminsih US compettiveness The net cost to US econmy from trading with China has been a Trade Deficit of US $ 300 billion per year but when you add to it the cost of unemeployment here, reduced tax base. higher oil & raw material prices, siphoning off of US know how by US Corp.s, China's own Cyber crimes & IP theft, larger US defense expenditure etc., Chinese influence on US investors and therefore politicians it is at least 3X of the Trade Deficit. So over the last 20 years the US public has lost to China at least US $ 15 trillion, a no. in excess of the current US deficit o $ 14 trillion. Compared to that the $2 trillion or so that the US Corp..s and Hedge Funds have accumulated from China Trade is peanuts .

selinz
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re: Rare earths get rarer
selinz   8/9/2011 5:12:58 PM
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US has tons of mines that have been closed for a number of reasons, not the least being EPA mandated. if you look up rare earths on Wiki, you see that the US was the largest producer to the mid 80's. China can cause short term problems but in the long term, the US has alternatives.

krisi
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re: Rare earths get rarer
krisi   8/9/2011 5:00:25 PM
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I agree @Nick1000...regardless how you feel about this situation (see some post above) you have to admit that China is exploiting this game effectively...apparently the system of state controlled economy can have its advantages over free markets...Kris

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