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Report: 11 firms pitch Indian wafer fabs

9/14/2011 09:38 AM EDT
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prabhakar_deosthali
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re: Report: 11 firms pitch Indian wafer fabs
prabhakar_deosthali   9/17/2011 8:04:23 AM
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When a country makes a policy decision it has long term effects in mind. So the short term problems like TSMC having spare capacity and Brazil finding it difficult to stabilize its FAB should not deter a govt from taking such a decision. As far as the power situation is concerned , India has the capacity to establish the required power infrastructure. Considering India's progress in other areas such as IT , Chip design services, Automobile manufacturing and also considering its strategic importance in the Asian region it comes as a no surprise to me that Indian Govt is taking such a bold decision.

NAND_analyst
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re: Report: 11 firms pitch Indian wafer fabs
NAND_analyst   9/17/2011 4:10:24 PM
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IMHO, they would be better off targeting solar in order to get energy independent as soon as possible. That would help the environment as well. Both solar and chips are terrifically competitive industries, but energy will affect everything and anything that they do, and a properly planned distributed solar energy system will improve the daily life of everyone in the country in fundamental ways. Chip design is more important for them to have than actual chip manufacturing--fabless is the only way to go with Samsung and Intel both entering the foundry business, joining TSMC.

Bharat_A
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re: Report: 11 firms pitch Indian wafer fabs
Bharat_A   9/18/2011 3:42:25 PM
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I do agree with the optimistic outlook. But as you have rightly pointed out, "India has the capacity to establish the required power". Many of the developing countries have the capacity to provide basic amenities to the populace but its the management of resources that causes the scarcity. True. India is pacing towards IT, ChipDesign and Auto industries. But there is a significant, magnitude-level difference between Semiconductor mfg and the above industries. The cost of a "production stop" due to any of the "lack of resources" will be far more costly when compared to a production stop in IT/Auto industries. Also, by the time India establishes semi mfg as a domestic industry, the technology may change by 2 or 3 nodes, not to mention the wafer size/s. Secondly, the talent is also a concern. Although there are many Indians in world-wide-semi industry, most of them have PhD/MS degrees from other countries (US/UK/EU/Singapore/etc). India has to think about building academic programs & R&D capabilities to train the advanced tech force required for this job. A time-consuming task. Ofcourse, India can enter the semi mfg industry. But the question is - is it advantageous to do so? As "NAND_Analyst" pointed out above, India can strategically use its chipdesign/ IT skills to enter the "Fabless" sector. There are many parallels between semiconductor and solar sectors. Quite a few research parks are trying to apply the "SEMATECH" research model in solar industry as well. The industry is nascent and India has plenty of Solar radiation/year, compared to Germany which is leading the industry right now. It can solve the energy solutions as well. I am very interested in knowing what the 11 firms + Indian Govt is basing their argument in coming up with this idea? The reasons mentioned so far do not stack up to the weight of the argument.

elctrnx_lyf
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re: Report: 11 firms pitch Indian wafer fabs
elctrnx_lyf   9/19/2011 5:15:40 PM
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I would like to see this getting realized. Heard about the fabs in India from the last 6 years but never heard of any potential investment.

Ravindrakumar
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re: Report: 11 firms pitch Indian wafer fabs
Ravindrakumar   11/28/2012 4:07:11 AM
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It is a strategic decision which the country has taken. I am sure it will stand India in good stead by the end of this decade, both commercially and otherwise. Infrastructure needs specifically for the fab are trivial and addressable issues. In the 1960s, India was world class in transistor technology. But somehow we missed the microelectronics bus, due to policy decisions at the time. High time to correct this situation, (in fact quite overdue). Once the fab is up and running, it will surely be a commercial success, just catering to India's own needs; supported by some policy initiatives by Govt. The design and mfg ecosystem will automatically cluster around the fab and grow, once in place.

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