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Virginia Tech unveils HokieSpeed; supercomputer for the masses

1/6/2012 09:04 PM EST
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Kinnar
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re: Virginia Tech unveils HokieSpeed; supercomputer for the masses
Kinnar   1/9/2012 6:02:52 AM
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Very good effort on supercomputer research, the goal is very much good as the scientist wants to make the supercomputer accessible to the society, generally the access of HPC is only to the researchers in most of the countries, it will be really a great time if society can have access to this kind of HPC.

LiquidNitrogenOverclocking
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re: Virginia Tech unveils HokieSpeed; supercomputer for the masses
LiquidNitrogenOverclocking   1/10/2012 2:49:36 PM
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For $5750 per compute node, you could have a 6-core (12 threads with Hyperthreading active) at 4.60 Ghz per core with the i7-3960X architecture. http://www.liquidnitrogenoverclocking.com/monolith.shtml You might notice something similar if you look closely at HokiSpeed's compute node at the Monolith computer build by Liquid Nitrogen Overclocking.

Luis Sanchez
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re: Virginia Tech unveils HokieSpeed; supercomputer for the masses
Luis Sanchez   1/22/2012 8:53:20 AM
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It is impressive to read about how supercomputers are built. That's a lot of computing power! But... I think supercomputers are already in the pockets of the lay man. If we think of the processing power in the iPhone and compare it against the computers that were used in the Apollo mission to the moon we can certainly amaze ourselves and say that we have a supercomputer at the reach of our hands.

shikantaza
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re: Virginia Tech unveils HokieSpeed; supercomputer for the masses
shikantaza   12/21/2012 9:25:07 PM
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The whole Top500 thing is a silly focus of attention. A DARPA PM I knew used to talk about "macho-OPS." Most of these massively-parallel processing (MPP) systems fit that description. MPP systems try to use COTS (commercial off-the-shelf) parts to "save" on development costs. GPUs provide a lot of numerical bang for the buck, but don't work worth a hoot on data-dependent computations. MPP systems have ridiculous power consumption. Megawatts? Yow. MPP machines - particularly those employing GPUs - often support relatively narrow ranges of numerical applications. This ultimately ends up transforming serious problems - modeling real-time physical systems (brains, weather, etc.) - from computation-bound to storage-bound: real-time systems often can't be modeled in real time, requiring results to stack up somewhere so they can be displayed in a meaningful (non-glacial) way. I can't help but wonder if we could realize better ROI by funding more research in configurable architectures. FPGAs are the obvious starting point, but ASICs are needed to meet density/power needs of real, deployable systems that go into end-user devices.

shikantaza
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re: Virginia Tech unveils HokieSpeed; supercomputer for the masses
shikantaza   12/21/2012 9:30:26 PM
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Luis, I agree with your idea and spirit! An iPhone5 has tremendous computing power. Now, if we could get SW developers to push back when performance/development-cost arguments are raised. Contemporary code is inefficient/sloppy when compared to what was written 40 years ago. Your reference to Apollo-capsule computers is right on target!

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