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Ultrabooks get some much needed extras

1/10/2012 05:09 PM EST
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DrQuine
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re: Ultrabooks get some much needed extras
DrQuine   1/14/2012 4:51:13 PM
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Making the Ultrabook a unified communications and computing makes sense. We shouldn't be carrying pagers, smartphones, tablets, and laptop computers when we travel. Managing the data between devices is much worse than having one integrated device (with a mute).

pjduncan
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re: Ultrabooks get some much needed extras
pjduncan   1/11/2012 6:39:12 AM
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Do we really need notifications for email and such popping up on our ultrabook as well as our phone? I'd rather have my ultrabook not have to have connectivity up when it's closed to save power and simply rely on my phone to notify me of things like email even if I then choose to open the ultrabook to respond.

rick merritt
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re: Ultrabooks get some much needed extras
rick merritt   1/10/2012 7:53:28 PM
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The gap of Intel's differentiation is narrowing. The Ultrabook is the 2013 version of the Mac Air. About the same time Intel's Atom has the same power dissipation as a high-end ARM multicore processor, the latter will have similar performance to Atom...then, no gap.

nicolas.mokhoff
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re: Ultrabooks get some much needed extras
nicolas.mokhoff   1/10/2012 5:45:40 PM
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Nikiski quick preview panel for Ultrabooks sounds like a winner to me. So does Intel's partnership with voice recognition company Nuance. These two HMIs are a natural way to communicate and will add much to the Ultrabook experience, as long as Intel and its partners can execute beyond demos at CES.

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