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Body monitoring devices; a healthy trend at CES

1/11/2012 08:15 AM EST
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Sanjib.A
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re: Body monitoring devices; a healthy trend at CES
Sanjib.A   1/16/2012 6:13:00 PM
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I think that's why Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is emerging to be the next place for the upcoming developments, which was one of the highlights in CES 2012.

Luis Sanchez
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re: Body monitoring devices; a healthy trend at CES
Luis Sanchez   1/12/2012 8:09:44 PM
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I think NFC isn't the best because NFC works at very short distances, basically forcing the user to "touch" the active device with the passive device. But Bluetooth instead is built for the Personal Area Network, the range is slightly bigger and now that we have Bluetooth 4.0 with its Low Energy technology or "Smart" (as marketing calls it) the power consumption will not be a problem.

goafrit
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re: Body monitoring devices; a healthy trend at CES
goafrit   1/11/2012 7:05:30 PM
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Bluetooth may not be the best way to go. It takes more power. One has to consider NFC chip which consumers much less.

agk
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re: Body monitoring devices; a healthy trend at CES
agk   1/11/2012 11:09:06 AM
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body media already available for $199 with blue tooth. Upon wearing this device it monitors all our activities and the software collects 5000 data points from this device. monitors for skin temperature, heat flux, gavonic skin response and a three axis accelerometer to measure motion detects our sleep or wake up. Also this gives the calorie values used by the body.Help full for diet control.video could have been better by showing the operation of this device in real time

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