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IBM reports progress on quantum computing

2/28/2012 05:30 AM EST
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Dave.Dykstra
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re: IBM reports progress on quantum computing
Dave.Dykstra   2/28/2012 4:15:40 PM
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This could really open up some possibilities. Hopefully, they'll be able to move the development to not require the use of super-cooled components as that makes it less useable commercially, but doesn't stop the progress. Of course, we have all heard the "un-crackable encryption codes" story line before - extremely difficult maybe, but un-crackabe is very doubtful. However, if it requires the use of a Quantum computer to crack, maybe it would keep the hackers out for some time anyway.

selinz
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re: IBM reports progress on quantum computing
selinz   2/28/2012 7:14:33 PM
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Q from the peanut gallery. Does having supercooled junctions everywhere limit it's use to laboratories?

amg
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re: IBM reports progress on quantum computing
amg   2/28/2012 8:47:49 PM
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I read it as they had to super cool the apparatus to slow it down enough to measure it with today's equipment. This leads one to question whether or not they can maintain the millisecond coherence time 'at speed' - when the apparatus is not super cooled?

LarryM99
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re: IBM reports progress on quantum computing
LarryM99   2/28/2012 9:08:24 PM
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One thing I have not heard is whether or not anyone is working on the software for this beast. Speaking as someone who has written a few lines of code, I have no idea how to program for it. I am pretty sure that the OS is going to be more involved than just doing a Linux port, and I suspect that applications are also going to have to be written differently. Is anyone working on this, or are you hardware guys just going to pitch it over the fence when you are done? :-) Larry M.

old account Frank Eory
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re: IBM reports progress on quantum computing
old account Frank Eory   2/28/2012 11:02:23 PM
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"or are you hardware guys just going to pitch it over the fence when you are done? :-)" Isn't that what we hardware guys always do? Why should it be different this time? :)

LarryM99
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re: IBM reports progress on quantum computing
LarryM99   2/29/2012 2:46:44 AM
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Hey, I'm old enough to be used to that (6502, Z-80, PDP-11, M68K, etc.) unlike programmers today who only have to contend with the latest x86 incarnations. It's amazing how software has actually been able to make progress when CPU architectures don't get radical makeovers every six months or so. Larry M.

R_Colin_Johnson
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re: IBM reports progress on quantum computing
R_Colin_Johnson   2/29/2012 4:41:04 AM
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Supercooling experimental devices is often done just to simplify the experiements, with the final production units optimized for running at room temperature. However, in this case the superconducting JJs are dependent on the supercooling, so they may end up like mag-lev trains--requiring cyrogenics even in normal use.

A.Ahmed
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re: IBM reports progress on quantum computing
A.Ahmed   2/29/2012 9:47:40 PM
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Writing software for such as beast would be almost impossible. In fact it would be counter productive to have the software ride on the Qunatum computers -- it will drag their effective speed down to halt!

Jim Murduck
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re: IBM reports progress on quantum computing
Jim Murduck   3/2/2012 8:08:44 PM
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I can see the ambiguity but I believe it's the capacitance rather than cooling which is lowering the frequency of operation.

ndancer
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re: IBM reports progress on quantum computing
ndancer   3/2/2012 9:07:39 PM
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" ... drag their effective speed down to a halt" Isn't that what software does best? :)

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