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Windows 8 consumer preview in pictures

3/5/2012 10:39 AM EST
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DrQuine
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re: Windows 8 consumer preview in pictures
DrQuine   3/11/2012 10:52:03 PM
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Absolutely. My parent's generation devoted no mental bandwidth to the arcane details of how to accomplish tasks on computers. Today we are forced to relearn basic skills every time Windows or Office is re-released. WHY? What benefit does a legacy user gain? As a minimum, there should be a button to "Behave Like Windows 98" or "Behave Like Office 1997". Since we have automated translators between human languages, this task should be trivial.

Chee Choy
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re: Windows 8 consumer preview in pictures
Chee Choy   3/8/2012 10:13:52 PM
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It seems to be Window software engineering is an adhoc engineering keep changing in short period of time, this means window users, has to keep buying new versions..... endless addicted to buy window OS, why not Window engineering group sit down to think very very deep your future plan of Window software direction, be your software upgradeable from here and there for a longer period of upgrade of features and function before a complete new consolidate version !!!

CityChipMan
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re: Windows 8 consumer preview in pictures
CityChipMan   3/8/2012 10:42:34 AM
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I think it's a really clever strategy from Microsoft; leverage their dominance in PC to make consumers familiar with their smartphone UI. Carriers say they want a 3rd "ecosystem" for smartphones (divide & conquer) and Microsoft is stepping neatly up to the plate. My understanding is that you can run either/or of the two UIs on a PC? I have a Nokia/Microsoft smartphone (Lumia 800) it's very easy to use

Neo10
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re: Windows 8 consumer preview in pictures
Neo10   3/8/2012 2:26:00 AM
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To be fair it looks clean and neat but there is this big but, would it perform so smoothly on a real mobile device which people carry around is the big question. And I really wonder how much of battery drain these tiles would cause due to their always on presence. At least they could have changed the name IE to something snazzy and kept it light but they are headstrong aren't they..

cdhmanning
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re: Windows 8 consumer preview in pictures
cdhmanning   3/8/2012 2:06:24 AM
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There is a broken logic in One Size Fits All. It never does. Think, say, how terrible a steering wheel would be on a bicycle or how terrible handle bars would be for a car! Different form factors are best served with different interfaces. This exactly the same mistake that Microsoft made with WinCE, but now they are making it the other way. Remember when Microsoft rolled out WinCE? It had the old "start button" UI just like a PC. Nobody could convince Microsoft that this was a terrible UI for a handheld device. Finally Microsoft have gone away from the start button UI for mobile, but now the idea has traction they can't stop dragging the idea onto the desktop where it is a terrible idea.

Bert22306
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re: Windows 8 consumer preview in pictures
Bert22306   3/7/2012 11:26:09 PM
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Yes, but Sylvie, this brings back my repeated question: does anyone do any work anymore? Or is everyone just passing the time of day tweeting to one another or reading facebook pages on the run? The touch screen does not work well in any setting where the user is not within easy reach of the screen. For that matter, if you have to be using a keyboard anyway, even with a laptop, it might not be so great to have to reach out and swipe on the screen whenever you want to styart a new app or browse a different web site.

Yog-Sothoth
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re: Windows 8 consumer preview in pictures
Yog-Sothoth   3/7/2012 6:02:30 PM
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The Metro UI looks ugly. I don't think it looks good on a phone or tablet, and it looks even worse on a traditional PC. There's just nothing elegant about it, just blocks of kindergarten color and simple typefaces. Microsoft seem to have teamed up with Nokia on having a collective funeral, what a shame.

phoenixdave
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re: Windows 8 consumer preview in pictures
phoenixdave   3/7/2012 5:12:21 PM
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Microsoft has the most to lose in this evolving world of Cloud Computing and Virtual Apps. I believe the success of Windows 8 is critical for Microsoft to remain in their dominant position. When Vista was released, there was no Tablet Computers, touch-screen smart phones, or Google Android OS. Putting out a sub-par product such as Vista (or for those older readers Me) is a public relations problem, but has no real long-term affect. However, the whole computing environment is undergoing a fundamental change, and Microsoft has seemed to be slow to recognize the potential long-term affect it could have on them. This seems to be an attempt to bring them back to relevancy in this new environment, as much as an update of an operating system.

DavidPK
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re: Windows 8 consumer preview in pictures
DavidPK   3/7/2012 5:05:43 PM
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All I see are pretty pictures that home consumers will love. Big tiles all over the screen make the computer illiterate say "Oooo, pretty." What does this do for me, as an Electronics Designer? Will my applications run faster? Will it absolutely force application developers to use the APIs instead of directly running the hardware? That's the biggest reason for application instability and crashes. User interfaces bore me, I'm still using the "Windows Classic" look on XP-64. What difference does it matter if my window borders look "curvier"? My desktop doesn't need touch screen, can you imagine running wires around a schematic with your fingers on the screen? My arms feel sore already! Gripe, gripe, gripe, that's all I do. Happy days!

SylvieBarak
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re: Windows 8 consumer preview in pictures
SylvieBarak   3/7/2012 4:03:29 PM
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Well, on the other hand, there's a whole generation that is now growing up with "touch" as a natural interface, and for them, this will be a very natural and intuitive experience. I think Microsoft has to move with the times and with the generation... I'm sure it will probably be a bit of an annoyance for people who are used to the older version, but people will get used to it very quickly and will forget they even had to get used to it. I see that happen so often these days. I actually think this is Microsoft's best OS yet, and I can't wait to have a seamless experience across several devices! That will be a welcome change and one well worth adapting to, in my book!

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