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Broadcom rolls two-port 100G switch

4/30/2012 12:00 PM EDT
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markhahn0
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re: Broadcom rolls two-port 100G switch
markhahn0   4/30/2012 6:54:54 PM
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hah, very droll! at two-port switch indeed! can the switch actually be configured to any use whose bandwidth sums to less than 240 Gb? such as 1x 100Gb and 14 10Gb? I personally have a hard time understanding the lassitude of the eth market - for those who actually care about latency and bandwidth, the IB world has been delivering 36-port 40 or 56Gb fabrics for quite a while. in what way does a mere 240Gb device "reset the market"?

docdivakar
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re: Broadcom rolls two-port 100G switch
docdivakar   4/30/2012 9:44:15 PM
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@markhahn: it is probably because IB has not been successful in penetrating the datacenter market and remains a niche for HPC clusters. Secondly, switches with CXP/QSFP interconnects have fabric extenders that support downstream 10Gig RJ-45, a great advantage for legacy installations that IB doesn't serve. MP Divakar

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