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IHS India: Cache SSDs vs. hybrid HDDs in ultrabooks

6/18/2012 08:41 PM EDT
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eewiz
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re: IHS India: Cache SSDs vs. hybrid HDDs in ultrabooks
eewiz   6/24/2012 2:20:44 PM
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In addition to the boot up time, I heard the Apps load much faster in an SSD compared to HDD. Recently ordered a 180GB Intel SSD from Amazon for my Macbook pro. Yet to stick it in and measure performance. Lot of my friends say a 3 year old notebook with SSD has better perceivable performance than a brand new notebook with HDD. check out this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nis7EhEqo1o

jane xu
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re: IHS India: Cache SSDs vs. hybrid HDDs in ultrabooks
jane xu   6/23/2012 3:59:04 PM
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It saves more than a few seconds of embarrassment when getting into a meeting late and with people waiting for you to confess the failure analysis findings with cross-section evidence in your notebook, or whatever you call it.

chanj0
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re: IHS India: Cache SSDs vs. hybrid HDDs in ultrabooks
chanj0   6/19/2012 8:27:57 PM
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I've been using hybrid HDD since Seagate released in 1+ years ago. Price is one of the reasons. The primary reason is actually capacity. I have a 500G which wasn't available in SSD at the time. Performance is better than a laptop grade HDD. System bootup time is not as impressive as when SSD is used. Yet, computer typically boots once in a day. It doesn't really bother me. What's your experience with SSD or hybrid HDD?

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