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Four companies prep wave of 60 GHz chips

7/23/2012 12:00 PM EDT
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rick merritt
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re: Four companies prep wave of 60 GHz chips
rick merritt   7/23/2012 6:06:44 PM
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Is 60 GHz the future of Wi-Fi?

jakmal
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re: Four companies prep wave of 60 GHz chips
jakmal   7/23/2012 7:33:38 PM
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802.11ad will probably emerge as a complementary technology to 802.11ac ; Problem with 60 GHz is the range issue. If I remember correctly, Wilocity only claimed in-room communication with WiGig. In order to cover the whole household, 60 GHz doesn't seem to fit the bill right now. That said, 60 GHz does enable much higher bandwidth, so it is definitely useful for connecting 'wireless' peripherals to mobile workstations / ultrabooks. The big task for Wilocity (who happen to be a bit early to the party right now) is to convince the market to adopt this technology.

BOMBOVA
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re: Four companies prep wave of 60 GHz chips
BOMBOVA   7/23/2012 8:34:42 PM
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Rick, if you mean by the dominant use future , i don't think so. this search for consumer bandwidth has diminishing human performance returns. As individuals we only need 50 Mega bit second data rates, for an individual. some of us don't want to turn into data idiots. Cheers.

rick merritt
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re: Four companies prep wave of 60 GHz chips
rick merritt   7/23/2012 11:04:18 PM
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I don't expect 11ad will replace 11ac given the short range of 60 GHz. What I wonder is if 11ad support will someday become a check box for mainstream Wi-Fi chips--or not.

PJames
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re: Four companies prep wave of 60 GHz chips
PJames   7/24/2012 12:06:41 AM
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It will never replace the lower bands as the range is so much less.

eewiz
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re: Four companies prep wave of 60 GHz chips
eewiz   7/24/2012 1:57:43 AM
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Unless we have new applications that demand such high speed, this may not be necessary. Currently the most popular use of WiFi is to connect to a router or some peripherals. None of this require a 3Gbps connection.

Battar
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re: Four companies prep wave of 60 GHz chips
Battar   7/24/2012 5:46:20 AM
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60GHz has it's own pros and cons. It doesn't work outside whene it's raining because the attenuation is too great. The fact that it doesn't work greater than room range is actually a benefit - you can set up independent networks in adjacent rooms with no interference or possibility of "eavesdropping". This makes the networks inherently secure - a huge advantage. Now consider the application of a 60GHz link for an entertainment network...

Robotics Developer
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re: Four companies prep wave of 60 GHz chips
Robotics Developer   7/24/2012 5:36:38 PM
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I am assuming that the range limitation is a function of both the transmit frequency and the power. Given the high frequency being used does the current "in-room" limiting come from the walls or distance? I am guessing walls, given the comment about rain attenuation. I could see a future product like 3D TV to headsets for "surround theater" experiences - in a room. The 60Ghz carrier would have enough bandwidth to support a number of users per room. Is this the future of movie theaters?

Bill SJ
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re: Four companies prep wave of 60 GHz chips
Bill SJ   7/24/2012 8:07:02 PM
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I must missed something here. All these WiFi 11ac 11ad etc. provides ample bandwidth for AV streaming in home, blah, blah. But majority consumer has 1.5Mbs to 6.0Mbs downstream from Internet. Unless consumers create HD contents themselves in house, which is occasionally at best. I still use 11G on the DSL modem/router. I subscribe 3Mbs but AT&T give me less than 1.5Mps effectively and AT&T make little web (news) video clip painful to watch so AT&T can sell UVerse to me. What is the point of 11ac 11ad?

Bert22306
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re: Four companies prep wave of 60 GHz chips
Bert22306   7/24/2012 8:21:31 PM
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My take on this is, the original 60 GHz proposals were for "personal area networks," i.e. 10 meter range or so, and were oriented towards the same tasks that previously the much-hyped ultrawideband techniques were supposed to fill. Now the IEEE 802.11ad work has also adopted 60 GHz, but their goal is to equal the range performance of all other 802.11 variants. So the thinking is, you used the lower 2.4 or 5 GHz frequency bands to locate the 60 GHz users, and then you use beam forming to get the range. Yes, it does seem that the IEEE wants to make 802.11ad the next evolutionary step. And the much greater bi rate should help support more use cases, e.g. even sending uncompressed HDTV, e.g. from a receiver to a display, without wires.

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