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Circuit protection can't be an afterthought

8/20/2012 03:55 PM EDT
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DadOf3TeenieBoppers
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re: Circuit protection can't be an afterthought
DadOf3TeenieBoppers   8/27/2012 2:56:33 PM
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I have seen 74AC logic turn into miniature volcanoes with a hole in the middle of the package, bond wires strung out in the air, and all of the silicon vaporized when someone wearing a nylon shirt rubbed up against the board one day. The poor guy nearly jumped out of his skin when it happened. Static happens. Plan for it. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Sanjib.A
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re: Circuit protection can't be an afterthought
Sanjib.A   8/26/2012 9:34:23 AM
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In general, the most vulnerable parts of the handheld devices through which ESD could cause damage are the ports (such as USB) exposed to the user. Proper protection is needed for the ports.

DrQuine
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re: Circuit protection can't be an afterthought
DrQuine   8/22/2012 4:10:57 AM
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Regardless of the tremendous number of opportunities for static electricity to damage portable electronic devices, such events seem to be rare. We've all walked across a rug on a dry winter day and experienced a shock when we touched a conductive surface ... Is it because of exceptional circuit design or is it simply that the outer case of the devices serves as a Faraday cage and protects the contents that we rarely experience catastrophic events for our handheld devices under such circumstances?

Brutus_II
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re: Circuit protection can't be an afterthought
Brutus_II   8/21/2012 4:08:03 PM
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To take it a step further, ESD and EMI protection can be combined as a single step (EMI from EMP generated from such nasty things as weapon detonation very high in the atmosphere at say, the center of the U.S.). The fix is simple and relatively inexpensive. Yet in a such a competitive industry where every last mil (1/10 cent) counts, such things are not usually considered save for military and a few other critical applications. Our cars and PC's are not considered critical, unfortunately.

ReneCardenas
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re: Circuit protection can't be an afterthought
ReneCardenas   8/21/2012 3:28:34 PM
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It may not be thaught in college but it is among the first lessons learned after a poorly under-rated fuse is spec'd, and the rush currents get closer scrutiny in all those odd cases that nobody thought were possible. Yeap, most EE experience that in at least the first project, I agree since most testing is limited by time2market constraints.

Michael J.
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re: Circuit protection can't be an afterthought
Michael J.   8/20/2012 8:31:32 PM
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Any good ESD protection device will offer more than just protection from super high voltage discharge. A breakdown voltage slightly outside the signal voltage range also prevent from damage of transients. A combination of ESD protection and e.g. EMI-filtering also reduces the cost adder for the ESD only function.

Kinnar
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re: Circuit protection can't be an afterthought
Kinnar   8/20/2012 8:03:49 PM
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ESD is more problematic in the cold and dry areas, on equatorial plane it is not that much problem creating. But still protection is must, self resetting fuses are great designs. This too requires proper selection in a way the fuses it self does not get damaged that it could not reset.

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