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Kalray claims customers for 256-core processor

Applications galore
9/17/2012 10:57 AM EDT
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dbrochart
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re: Kalray claims customers for 256-core processor
dbrochart   9/17/2012 3:31:46 PM
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Can anyone tell me how different is Kalray's solution compared to Simpulse's? They both look like doing high data rate signal processing so it would be interesting to see which applications they are best at and how they differentiate.

Jeff.Milrod
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re: Kalray claims customers for 256-core processor
Jeff.Milrod   9/18/2012 3:38:25 PM
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Simpluse is IP and tools only - no chip. A more relevant comparison is Adapteva's Epiphany, and the chip they did for BittWare called Anemone, which is a true C-programmable many-core floating point co-processor

tb1
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re: Kalray claims customers for 256-core processor
tb1   9/18/2012 5:48:43 PM
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And how does this compare to GPU chips? NVidia's Tesla has 3072 cores. And what about the Tilera 100 core processors? Or are these geared toward a different, specific application than these other chips?

MeirG
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re: Kalray claims customers for 256-core processor
MeirG   9/19/2012 12:12:41 PM
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A more interesting issue is how easy would it be to develop software, and how efficient would be the run-time code? Any experience?

dbrochart
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re: Kalray claims customers for 256-core processor
dbrochart   9/19/2012 12:20:19 PM
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Simpulse has a Matlab-like entry level software, and the efficiency depends on the hardware configuration - core number, specialized accelerators, etc.

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